DYSPEPSIA GENERATION

We have seen the future, and it sucks.

Archive for the 'Think about it.' Category

Relinkquishment

30th March 2017

Slate Star Codex has a list of just general links to interesting stuff.

Scott Alexander reads the way I do, just covers different stuff — which is why I read his blog.

Example:

During the 1500s, the Caribbean was teeming with Jewish pirates, who named their ships things like Queen Esther and Shield of Abraham and had swashbuckling nicknames like “The Pirate Rabbi”.

This month in bad graphs: Family Inequality on the weird way the New York Times confuses the trend in car accidents, and Stuart Buck on how some of the hype about rising white-working-class mortality comes from graph that exaggerates its point by using two different y-axes.

A Miami lawyer’s pants burst into flames while he was arguing in court. One hopes the judge instructed the jury to ignore the kabbalistic implications.

Tesco finalizes deal to give all unsold food to charity.

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Thought for the Day

29th March 2017

Wanting More Out Of Life - Dilbert by Scott Adams

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In Its New Factory, Impossible Foods Will Make 12 Million Pounds Of Plant-Based Burgers A Year

29th March 2017

Read it.

Prediction: In any contest between a Real Hamburger and a Fake Hamburger, the Real Hamburger will win every time.

Notice how many people are making fake meat out of plants, and how nobody is making fake plants out of meat. Think about that.

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Once We Listened to the Beatles. Now We Eat Beetles.

29th March 2017

Tyler Cowen looks at what the Crust obsesses about these days.

Since the 1960s and ’70s, food has replaced music’s centrality to American culture. These are invariably somewhat subjective impressions, but I’d like to lay out my sense of how the social impact of music has fallen and the social role of food has risen.

Most of the top music from the 1990s, such as say Alanis Morissette, would sound current if released today, a sign of cultural stasis in what was once a highly socially charged and rapidly changing sector. In 1967, music from 20 or even 10 years earlier sounded quite different and indeed archaic.

Restaurants are increasingly an organizing and revitalizing force in our cities, and eating out has continued to rise as a means of socializing. America’s educated professional class may be out of touch with sports and tired of discussing the weather, and so trading information about new or favorite restaurants, or recipes and ingredients, has become one of the new all-purpose topics of conversation. Food is a relatively gender-neutral topic, and furthermore immigrant newcomers can be immediately proud of what they know and have eaten.

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How Utah Keeps the American Dream Alive

28th March 2017

Megan McArdle visits America for Bloomberg News.

There’s no getting around it: For a girl raised on the Upper West Side of Manhattan, Salt Lake City is a very weird place.

I went to Utah precisely because it’s weird. More specifically, because economic data suggest that modest Salt Lake City, population 192,672, does something that the rest of us seem to be struggling with: It helps people move upward from poverty. I went to Utah in search of the American Dream.

Columnists don’t talk as much as they used to about the American Dream. They’re more likely to talk about things like income mobility, income inequality, the Gini coefficient?—?sanitary, clinical terms. These are easier to quantify than a dream, but also less satisfying. We want money, yes, but we hunger even more deeply for something else: for possibility. It matters to Americans that someone born poor can retire rich. That possibility increasingly seems slimmer and slimmer in most of the nation, but in Utah, it’s still achievable.

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‘Sanctuary’ Cities

28th March 2017

You will have noticed, if you have been paying attention, that the loudest clamoring about being ‘sanctuary cities’ comes from yuppie hipster enclaves like San Francisco or Malibu or West Palm Beach or Manhattan. The reason for this is that the Upper Crust can’t afford to lose their Underclass dependents, upon whom they rely for domestic servants, nannies and housekeepers and yardboys and such.

Scrape off the icing of virtue-posturing and that’s all it is. Those who scream loudest about ‘living wage’ are the same ones who are ready to die in the last ditch to continue paying their illegal servitors a less-than-market wage for their Upper Crust lifestyle.

So, as with any other area of life, tune out the bleatings and follow the money.

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Thought for the Day

28th March 2017

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How to Act Like You’re Bright

28th March 2017

Eric Raymond provides some advice to those who are not.

This blog post is brought to you by a recent bad experience I had watching a 5-minute clip from Big Bang Theory on the recommendation of a friend who thought I might find it amusing.

Bleagh. This is supposed to be a show about geniuses? It’s not. It’s a show about a dimwit’s idea of what bright people are like. The slowest person in my peer group could out-think and out-create any of these sad-sack imitations of “smart” on any day of the week.

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Alabama Congressman Files One-Sentence Bill to Repeal ObamaCare

28th March 2017

Read it.

That’s all it takes.

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Vegan Love: The Dating Manual for Finding a Partner When You Don’t Eat Meat, Dairy or Eggs

27th March 2017

Read it.

This will tell you what to avoid to escape these twits.

I figure that tattoos and a man-bun figure prominently, but I don’t care that much to actually find out.

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There’s a Wire Above Manhattan That You’ve Probably Never Noticed

26th March 2017

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Funny, it doesn’t look Jewish.

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A Modest Proposal

26th March 2017

Severian ups the ante.

Recently we had a “Day Without Women,” because Hillary Clinton lost the election or something.  As Morgan points out, it didn’t accomplish much, mostly because the kinds of chicks who could afford to skip work to go block traffic don’t do anything productive anyway.

Which is why I think Lefties should go for the gusto.  Stacy McCain is forever alerting us to feminists who think white people are evil (good gravy, man, how do you stand searching this stuff out?).  I’d like to encourage those feminists, and everyone who retweets, favorites, upvotes, or otherwise expresses approval of these kinds of sentiments, to organize A Day Without White People.  By not using anything built, maintained, or invented by white people, these feminists could show all us evil pale penis people just how totally worthless and unnecessary — and, of course, evil — we really are.  Seeing as how math, science, medicine, the rule of law, etc. are all social constructions anyway, it should be no problem going without them for 24 hours.

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Thought for the Day

26th March 2017

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Bloke Whose Drone Was Blasted Out of Sky by Angry Dad Loses Another Court Battle for Compo

26th March 2017

Read it.

In July 2015, William Merideth, 47, was at home in Hillview, Kentucky, America, when his daughter came in from sunbathing in the garden to say there was a drone buzzing overhead. As a firm believer in his Second Amendment rights, Merideth loaded up his shotgun with bird shot, waited until the camera-fitted quadcopter came over his home, and then took it down with a single shot – which bought the drone’s operators running.

“They asked me, ‘Are you the S-O-B that shot my drone?’ and I said, ‘Yes I am’,” he told journalists. “I had my Glock on me and they started toward me and I told them, ‘If you cross my sidewalk, there’s gonna be another shooting’.”

Heh.

The police were called and they arrested Merideth – not for shooting down the drone per se, but for discharging a firearm within city limits. In October, a judge agreed with Merideth (now known as the Drone Slayer) that he was within his rights to take down the trespassing drone. The dad was cleared of all charges.

And rightly so.

David Boggs, the drone’s owner, was not a happy chap. He sued Merideth for the $1,500 it had cost to replace his toy, insisting that only the US Federal Aviation Administration has the right to control airspace, so his aircraft couldn’t have been trespassing.

 

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Chicago Bleeds Population for Second Year in a Row

24th March 2017

Read it.

Gee, I wonder why?

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The Myth of the Pristine Amazon Rainforest

23rd March 2017

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Trees that were domesticated by pre-Columbian peoples still dominate the forests of the Amazon Basin. The findings put a dent in the notion that the vast rainforests were untouched by human hands before the arrival of the Spanish explorers in South America. In an article published in Science, an international team including Florian Wittmann from the Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, the scientists report their findings.

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Baby Boomers Are ‘a Generation of Sociopaths’

23rd March 2017

Read it.

And we’re coming for you. There ARE no ‘safe spaces’.

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Thought for the Day

23rd March 2017

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Drinking Pint of Beer a Day Linked to Reduced Risk of Heart Attack

23rd March 2017

Read it.

Well. There it is.

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Chelsea Clinton To Receive Lifetime Achievement Award For Some Reason

22nd March 2017

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Chelsea Clinton is set to receive a lifetime achievement award from Variety magazine next month, though it is unclear why.

Well, she survived to adulthood with Bill Clinton as her father and Hillary Clinton as her mother. I find that impressive.

Clinton’s other achievements include being born to one of the most skilled politicians in American history, growing up in the White House, landing a $600,000 contract with MSNBC, marrying a hedge fund millionaire, and tweeting constantly about President Trump.

That’s more than I’ve ever achieved. I’m convinced.

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The Different Kinds of Electrical Outlets You Can Install in Your House

22nd March 2017

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Just in case you were wondering. I know I was.

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Why American Farmers Are Hacking Their Tractors With Ukrainian Firmware

22nd March 2017

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To avoid the draconian locks that John Deere puts on the tractors they buy, farmers throughout America’s heartland have started hacking their equipment with firmware that’s cracked in Eastern Europe and traded on invite-only, paid online forums.

Tractor hacking is growing increasingly popular because John Deere and other manufacturers have made it impossible to perform “unauthorized” repair on farm equipment, which farmers see as an attack on their sovereignty and quite possibly an existential threat to their livelihood if their tractor breaks at an inopportune time.

Our ‘intellectual property’ laws are insane.

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The Social Machine

21st March 2017

Kevin Williamson lays it out.

The purpose of an automobile factory is not to “create jobs,” as the politicians like to say. Its function is not to add to the employment rolls with good wages and UAW benefits, adding to the local tax base and helping to sustain the community — as desirable as all those things are. The purpose of an automobile factory is not to create jobs — it is to create automobiles. Jobs are a means, not an end. Human labor is valuable to the extent that it contributes to human prosperity and human flourishing, not in and of itself as a matter of abstraction.

Politicians always get this one wrong, because the aim of a politician is to get votes, and his perspective on a proposal is ‘Will this get me more votes?’ rather than ‘Will this make life better?’

If I were a Republican politician or someone paid to advise such creatures, I might point out that the great sources of friction in our public life right now have to do mainly with a few areas in which abundance has not been allowed to emerge. We have one economic model for producing food and mobile phones and automobiles, and a different one for producing health care and education, and to some extent (more in some areas of the country than others) housing. The typical American today can afford housing that is much better (larger, better built, better furnished) than could the typical American of his grandparents’ generation. He can afford a better car and better food than a millionaire of that generation. And he has access to better health care and educational options, too, but these have not improved at the rate of everything else in his life, and the options for financing them have become a source of insecurity and stress.

Life is better except where politics has gotten involved. Want a flying car? Get rid of political restrictions on what you can fly/drive and where.

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Rich People WANT Their Taxes Raised

21st March 2017

Lion of the Blogosphere has a theory, with which I disagree.

Rich people talk a lot about getting taxes raised, but if you listen closely they’re talking about tax rates on Ordinary Income, wages and such-like, and that’s not where they make their money.

And even if taxes were raised on the forms of income that they get, they still have a comparative advantage over people who make orders of magnitude less than they do. A tax rate of 50% or even 90% is not going to hurt very much when you’re pulling down a hundred mil a year, but if you’re only making a hundred thou, that drops you to poverty level pretty quickly.

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Thought for the Day

21st March 2017

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Coke and Pepsi: This Is the Real Difference in Taste

21st March 2017

Read it.

In his 2005 book Blink, he confirms that Pepsi has more of a citrus flavour, while coke is characterised by a raisiny-vanilla tang.

He also states that the sweeter and more citrusy taste behind Pepsi is why it usually wins in taste tests. This gives is a stronger blast of flavour while Coke is a lot smoother.

No, the reason is that Pepsi tastes like something a human being would want to drink, while Coke tastes like something you would want to clean rust off of furniture with. It’s really just that simple.

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Meet the Father-Son Duo Importing American Bison to Siberia to Save the Planet

21st March 2017

Read it.

Will the planet actually be saved? Stay tuned for the next thousand years.

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Canada Conjoins Euthanasia and Organ Harvesting

21st March 2017

Read it.

Maybe this fits in somehow with their illegal immigration problem.

Just sayin’.

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“I Declare Mobile Phone Carriers to Be Enemies of the State”

20th March 2017

Scott Adams sounds the tocsin.

Here’s the basic problem.

Kids as young as eleven have smartphones. That situation won’t change.

A kid with a smartphone has access to any illegal drug in the world, as well as all the peer pressure in the world.

Pills are small, cheap, odorless, widely available, and nearly impossible for a parent to find in a bedroom search. When you have this situation, the next generation is lost.

That is our current situation.

I would say, think of it as evolution in action. I doubt that Scott Adams would find that persuasive.

Update: Disqus locked me out of commenting on my own post after a few.

Perhaps it’s a conspiracy. Just sayin’.

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Are Robots Really Destined to Take Over Restaurant Kitchens?

20th March 2017

Read it.

Well, yeah. Especially if the Social Justice Warriors keep throwing poor people out of work by jacking up the minimum wage.

This past July, the BratWurst Bot, developed by the Forschungszentrum Informatik (FZI) Research Center for Information Technology in Karlsruhe, Germany, flawlessly took orders, cooked, and served over 200 meals for a salivating garden party crowd. “We had a few people at the party surprised that robotics can do something like this,” Arne Roennau, the department manager of robotics at FZI, said. “People are not aware that technology has come this far.”

As fast-food employees continue their Fight for $15, restaurant corporations have begun to look for, and invest in, technological replacements.

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Sitting Up

20th March 2017

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The world is divided into people who sit on the floor and those who sit on chairs.

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Can Tech Oligarchs Thrive Under Trump?

20th March 2017

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With the first billionaire in the White House, Wall Street booming and, for the first time in almost a decade, very solid and broad based job growth, one would think America’s business elite would be beaming. But that’s not so because the country’s moguls are more divided than at any time in recent history.

This conflict stems largely from divergent interests among rival factions of the putative ruling class. Trump’s backers tend to have links with the “real” economy, that is, those people who make things, such as energy producers, domestic manufacturers, agribusiness, suburban home-builders, and aerospace firms. These interests are increasingly concentrated in parts of America Trump painted “red”—the South, the Midwest, the Great Plains, and Appalachia.

On the other side lies the “ascendant” ephemeral economy, based in such industries as media, entertainment, software, and social media, as well as their financial backers. These industries are less affected by environmental regulations than those in more tangible lines of business. They are also concentrated in the deep blue slivers along the coasts and in college towns, the very places where the progressive social and environmental agenda is most deeply entrenched.

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Aussie Climate Scientist: Having a Baby Is an “Ethical Entanglement”

20th March 2017

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For a climate activist, having babies is apparently a troubling ethical dilemma, a distressing personal contribution to the global anthropogenic carbon footprint. But somehow they keep popping them out.

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Thought for the Day

18th March 2017

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Big Box Jesus

18th March 2017

Read it.

One of my cousins recently attended an event at a suburban church and I tagged along. I’m amoral and omnivorous. I’ll go to any house of worship on the odd chance I might actually learn something useful – and I often do. And I meet a lot of really nice people along the way. But mostly I like to explore the landscapes other people inhabit. Church provides an intimate glimpse into what people are thinking and feeling in a particular location.

I was immediately impressed with how much this church looked and functioned like a shopping mall. The size, shape, and general construction of the buildings and surrounding parking lots were indistinguishable from a large retail center. I spent more time than I probably should have trying to figure out which denomination it was. Catholic? Definitely not. Lutheran? Not exactly. Baptist? Meh. Mormon? Nope. It was a generic all inclusive Christian arrangement that celebrated the lack of any specific affiliation. Come and worship. We take all kinds. And enjoy the ample free parking and food court while you’re here. There was a well populated Christian school, a substantial auditorium, and all manner of programs and facilities. It was a highly successful suburban version of Big Box Jesus.

The Dallas term is ‘Godatorium’.

But then I looked out at the parking lot. How many people paid cash for their cars? I explored the subdivisions all around the church. How many people bought their suburban homes with cash? How many people are capable of setting aside even a sliver of savings on a regular basis ever. How many people bought their clothes and shoes and had their hair done with a credit card that got rolled over into a big ball of vague but gradually mounting debt? How many people are approaching middle age and still paying off student loan debt?

I understand the dynamics of contemporary accounting. Carrying mortgage debt provides a substantial tax advantage. Using “other people’s money” at a low interest rate to invest in an asset that consistently rises in value is smart and frees up cash to be deployed in other more productive ways. Putting cash into savings is inefficient since it sits in a bank earning near zero interest these days. Stock values keep rising so investing in equities is a no brainer.

You can’t go around wearing thrift store clothes and sporting a bowl haircut and expect to be taken seriously in a professional business setting. You don’t want to drive around in an old clunker and put your family at risk when you could have the latest safety and reliability features of a newer car bought on credit. If you can buy that car with a home equity loan and get the tax deduction, all the better. Everything about respectable modern life is predicated on people spending a certain amount of money in a very specific way that is nearly impossible to achieve on a cash basis. And that set of arrangements is in direct conflict with the traditional virtues of frugality, saving, and self reliance. Big Box Jesus takes Visa, Mastercard, and American Express.

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In Manufacturing and Retail, Robot Labor is Cheaper Than Slave Labor Would Be

17th March 2017

Read it.

Of course, when ‘slave’ is actually another word for ‘taxpayer’, that’s cold comfort.

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Escape to Another World

17th March 2017

Read it.

Over the last 15 years there has been a steady and disconcerting leak of young people away from the labour force in America. Between 2000 and 2015, the employment rate for men in their 20s without a college education dropped ten percentage points, from 82% to 72%. In 2015, remarkably, 22% of men in this group – a cohort of people in the most consequential years of their working lives – reported to surveyors that they had not worked at all in the prior 12 months. That was in 2015: when the unemployment rate nationwide fell to 5%, and the American economy added 2.7m new jobs. Back in 2000, less than 10% of such men were in similar circumstances.

What these individuals are not doing is clear enough, says Erik Hurst, an economist at the University of Chicago, who has been studying the phenomenon. They are not leaving home; in 2015 more than 50% lived with a parent or close relative. Neither are they getting married. What they are doing, Hurst reckons, is playing video games. As the hours young men spent in work dropped in the 2000s, hours spent in leisure activities rose nearly one-for-one. Of the rise in leisure time, 75% was accounted for by video games. It looks as though some small but meaningful share of the young-adult population is delaying employment or cutting back hours in order to spend more time with their video game of choice.

Think about it:

No fat ugly feminists screeching about The Patriarchy.

No welfare queens complaining that drinking milk is raaaaaaacist.

No nerd little shrimp of indeterminate sex complaining about what pronoun she/it is entitled to.

No minimum wage pricing out of the only jobs you’re qualified for.

No gangbangers whupping your ass because you looked at them on the street.

Just peace – and quiet – and fun.

What’s not to like?

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Thought for the Day

17th March 2017

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Thoughts From the Ammo Line: “Stop Telling Us Who We Are!”

17th March 2017

Read it.

Any time a Leftist disagrees with a policy, a person, or an idea, if he has already used up the tedious racist/sexist/whatever deal, and hasn’t started rioting yet, he has one more lame argument in his bag of tricks. He has learned from ex-President Obama, to point his nose skyward and assert, “That’s not who we are!” Please. Do us the courtesy of not telling us who we are when you don’t even know us. You know precious few Heartland Americans, as we can tell by the movies you make about us. They ring as true as Hillary’s mortifying black preacher accent when she’s “no ways tahrd.”

Barry’s other go-to threat was that we would end up on “the wrong side of history.” But History just kicked him in the nuts, as History will sometimes do, so it’s back to telling us who we are.

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Thought for the Day

16th March 2017

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How The West Was Won

16th March 2017

Scott Alexander deconstructs Western Civ.

I worry that Caplan is eliding the important summoner/demon distinction. This is an easy distinction to miss, since demons often kill their summoners and wear their skin. But in this case, he’s become hopelessly confused without it.

I am pretty sure there was, at one point, such a thing as western civilization. I think it involved things like dancing around maypoles and copying Latin manuscripts. At some point Thor might have been involved. That civilization is dead. It summoned an alien entity from beyond the void which devoured its summoner and is proceeding to eat the rest of the world.

“Western culture” is no more related to the geographical west than western medicine. People who complain about western culture taking over their country always manage to bring up Coca-Cola. But in what sense is Coca-Cola culturally western? It’s an Ethiopian bean mixed with a Colombian leaf mixed with carbonated water and lots and lots of sugar. An American was the first person to discover that this combination tasted really good – our technological/economic head start ensured that. But in a world where America never existed, eventually some Japanese or Arabian chemist would have found that sugar-filled fizzy drinks were really tasty. It was a discovery waiting to be plucked out of the void, like penicillin. America summoned it but did not create it. If western medicine is just medicine that works, soda pop is just refreshment that works.

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Library Hand, the Fastidiously Neat Penmanship Style Made for Card Catalogs

15th March 2017

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Influenced by Edison and honed via experimenting on patient, hand-sore librarians, library hand focused on uniformity rather than beauty. “The handwriting of the old-fashioned writing master is quite as illegible as that of the most illiterate boor,” read a New York State Library School handbook. “Take great pains to have all writing uniform in size, blackness of lines, slant, spacing and forms of letters,” wrote Dewey in 1887. And if librarians thought they could get away with just any black ink, they could think again real fast. “Inks called black vary much in color,” scoffed the New York State Library School handwriting guide.

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Thought for the Day

15th March 2017

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David Chang’s Unified Theory of Deliciousness

15th March 2017

Read it.

My first breakthrough on this idea was with salt. It’s the most basic ingredient, but it can also be hellishly complex. A chef can go crazy figuring out how much salt to add to a dish. But I believe there is an objectively correct amount of salt, and it is rooted in a counterintuitive idea. Normally we think of a balanced dish as being neither too salty nor undersalted. I think that’s wrong. When a dish is perfectly seasoned, it will taste simultaneously like it has too much salt and too little salt. It is fully committed to being both at the same time.

Try it for yourself. Set out a few glasses of water with varying amounts of salt in them. As you taste them, think hard about whether there is too much or too little salt. If you keep experimenting, you’ll eventually hit this sweet spot. You’ll think that it’s too bland, but as soon as you form that thought, you’ll suddenly find it tastes too salty. It teeters. And once you experience that sensation, I guarantee it will be in your head any time you taste anything for the rest of your life.

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“Frantic Yelling Ensued”

15th March 2017

Steve Sailer celebrates blowing up the Internet.

Congressman Steve King (R-IA) has noticed just how extremist today’s respectable conventional wisdom has become. So King has been exercising a Trump-like knack for trolling the Establishment with blunt truths that enrage goodthinkers into revealing just how much their worldview is founded upon hatred of average Americans.

King is particularly hateful because he represents Sioux County, Iowa, which Stanford economist Raj Chetty’s big 2015 study of IRS returns from 1996 to 2012 found to be the single best county in America for raising children who are upwardly mobile. Sioux County is extremely white, Protestant, native-born, traditionalist, and prosperous. It represents the egalitarian essence of everything that coastal elites find deplorable about the people they currently preside over.

Numerous talking heads responded to King that taking care of “somebody else’s babies” is what America has always been about. John Adams and the other Founding Fathers weren’t fathers looking out for the interests of their progeny. Instead they were inseminating an idea: that America exists for the benefit of the huddled masses of not-yet-arrived immigrants who are, by definition, the only true Americans.

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The Tribal States of America

14th March 2017

ZMan casts a jaundiced eye.

The hand-wringers all swear that we are reliving Weimar Germany and Trump is the 12th invisible Hitler the prophecies foretold. The inevitable result is the Cossacks galloping through the streets of Jewish neighborhoods. Maybe so, but I’m skeptical. Trump seems to get along well with the Tribe and he seems to love his Jewish grandchildren. He has quite a few Jewish advisers and business partners. Maybe they are not making Hitlers like they used to, but my hunch is he is not Hitler and we are not Weimar Germany.

Whites in American have never been anti-Semitic and have largely accepted the reality of Jewish success in America. In fact, most whites take some pride in it, seeing it as validation of America’s meritocratic culture. The millions of Muslims being imported will obviously be hostile to this arrangement. Hispanics and Asians don’t seem to care. Progressive whites, on the other hand, are increasingly anti-Semitic, suggesting there is a war brewing among the Cloud People. The Democrats coming close to putting Keith Ellison in charge is a good example.

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Study Claims Atheists Could Die Out Because They Love Birth Control So Much

14th March 2017

Read it.

Well, you know, stuff has consequences.

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Most Asylum Seekers Will Stay in Canada Even If Asylum Rejected

14th March 2017

Read it.

Well, good luck to ’em, eh.

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New Zealand Could Have Been Part of the United States

14th March 2017

Read it.

As historian Gerald Horne explains in the 2007 book The White Pacific, “When gold was discovered in Otago in 1861, it was the New Zealanders who attracted attention from California to the point where there was very temporary talk of New Zealand becoming a part of the United States. In both England and New Zealand it was widely believed that an independent New Zealand would gravitate toward the U.S. sphere.”

If the small colony of New Zealand had sought independence from Britain in the 1860s or 70s, Americans could well be calling it a territory, or even a state. After all, there were just 33 American states in 1860.

Recommended movie: Nate and Hayes.

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Thought for the Day

14th March 2017

Gallery: Matt cartoons, March 2017

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