DYSPEPSIA GENERATION

We have seen the future, and it sucks.

Archive for the 'Think about it.' Category

Thought for the Day

16th January 2017

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WaPo: “Trump Could Cause ‘The Death of Think Tanks as We Know Them’”

16th January 2017

Steve Sailer turns over a rock.

Much of the outrage over Trump is from the few thousands of people in the Republican and Democratic establishments who had good cause to hope back in 2015 that their resumes and thus net worths would be permanently burnished by spending a couple of years in a Hillary or Jeb White House, thus upping their market value to private industry.

Don’t think of it as selling out; think of it as buying in.

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Thought for the Day

15th January 2017

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Thought for the Day

14th January 2017

Fairness Is For Kids And Idiots - Dilbert by Scott Adams

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Diversity and Reality

13th January 2017

Read it.

In the movie The Godfather, there’s a scene where Don Corleone is giving Michael some advice about life. He says, “I spent my whole life trying not to be careless. Women and children can afford to be careless, but not men.” It’s a great line and it was true for most of human existence. The role of males in society has always exposed them to the greater risk. That and male competition has often been for keeps. When the stakes are high the room for error is smaller so men have always had to be the less reckless of the sexes.

We live in a soft age where women run most things so that means we live in a careless age as well. All sorts of silly and ridiculous things are indulged because the margin for error seems endless. You can make up a bunch of silly diversity rules, for example, on the college campus, because little serious work is done on the college campus. Most of what is done is busy work. In the areas where serious work is done, like the hard sciences, you see very little of the PC nonsense we associate with the academy.

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Thought for the Day

13th January 2017

Gallery: Matt cartoons, January 2017

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Technology Is Changing How We Live, But It Needs to Change How We Work

13th January 2017

Ezra Klein has some some shrewd observations.

When a grave-faced announcer on CNBC says “technology stocks are down today,” we all know he means Facebook and Apple, not Boeing and Pfizer. To Thiel, this signals a deeper problem in the American economy, a shrinkage in our belief of what’s possible, a pessimism about what is really likely to get better. Our definition of what technology is has narrowed, and he thinks that narrowing is no accident. It’s a coping mechanism in an age of technological disappointment.

“Technology gets defined as ‘that which is changing fast,'” he says. “If the other things are not defined as ‘technology,’ we filter them out and we don’t even look at them.”

“We were promised flying cars; we got 140 characters,” he likes to say.

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The Risk of Discovery

13th January 2017

Paul Graham.

Because biographies of famous scientists tend to edit out their mistakes, we underestimate the degree of risk they were willing to take. And because anything a famous scientist did that wasn’t a mistake has probably now become the conventional wisdom, those choices don’t seem risky either.

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Apple Is Stuck in 2010

13th January 2017

Read it.

And so are we.

Major Linux distros, Microsoft, PC hardware manufacturers, big industry turnarounds (Nokia, Blackberry, Motorola) the dawn of the GPU era, the end of Moore’s Law speed clock wars into parallel computing, the dawn of ARM. It took 10 years for all the smoke to finally settle, and it took having Apple standing still for 6 years for everybody to finally catch up.

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America’s ‘most organised woman’ reveals how she declutters her home without spending lots of money

13th January 2017

Read it.

“Go around your house and look for things you’re not utilising, look for things you can re-use and re-purpose to help you get organised,” Costello said.

Everything in Costello’s home is sorted and labelled, but the secret to her ultra-organised house is simply upcycling things she already owns: she uses old medicine bottles to store earbuds, coins and safety pins, and a square divider to keep her teabags in order.

On the other hand, nothing ‘declutters’ like simply Throwing Shit Out.

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Globalization’s Winner-Take-All Economy

13th January 2017

Read it.

“If you are a very talented person, you have a choice: You either go to New York or you go to Silicon Valley.”

This statement by Peter Thiel, the PayPal founder and venture capitalist, unsurprisingly caused a stir, given that he made it in Chicago. Simon Kuper had made a similar observation in the Financial Times when he described how young Dutch up-and-comers had their sights set on London, not Amsterdam. “Many ambitious Dutch people no longer want to join the Dutch elite,” Kuper wrote. “They want to join the global elite.”

This same attitude is leading to the drain of young people out of the small towns of the heartland into the big cities, often those on the coast. Anyone with an ounce of talent or ambition heads for the city.

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Thought for the Day

12th January 2017

I'm an Artist

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The Master Persuader Scrambles the Frame

11th January 2017

Scott Adams brings us up to date on Trump.

I’ve said before that half the country believe they are living in 1930s Germany and the other half think we got a better economy and some free entertainment. Those are two completely different movies running on the same screen at the same time. So how does the Master Persuader deal with the second-largest case of national cognitive dissonance in our history? (Slavery was first.)

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Thought for the Day

11th January 2017

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Why one Indiana city has more than 100 roundabouts

11th January 2017

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The comically high number of roundabouts in Carmel, Indiana, can be credited to Mayor Jim Brainard. Since taking the helm of the city in 1996, the urban planning-obsessed Brainard has overseen the elimination of dozens of traffic signals and the installation of some 102 roundabouts. Today, the city has more roundabouts than any other town in the United States, and they’re about to get 40 more.

Carmel is the Rich People’s Suburb of Indianapolis, as Scarsdale is to New York City, Highland Park is to Dallas, and Atherton is to San Francisco.

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Snowmageddon Kills 8 in The Balkans

10th January 2017

Read it.

How about that Global Warming, eh? Rising seas nipping at your toes yet?

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Europe Under Ice: Pictures Show the Freezing Weather That Has Gripped the Continent

9th January 2017

Read it.

How about that Global Warming, eh? Rising sea levels drowned Manhattan yet? (Or ANYWHERE?)

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Transcending Obamacare: A Patient-Centered Plan for Near-Universal Coverage and Permanent Fiscal Solvency

9th January 2017

Avik Roy does the heavy lifting.

  • The proposal contained herein—the “Universal Exchange Plan” (UEP)—seeks to substantially repair both sets of health-policy problems: those caused by the ACA and those that predate it; the UEP’s reforms are also perfectly compatible with the “repeal and replace” approach, but they do not require the full and formal repeal of the ACA in order to be enacted.
  • The UEP would, by 2025, increase the number of U.S. residents with health coverage by 12.1 million, relative to the ACA; beyond 2025, the UEP would outperform the ACA by an even wider margin.
  • The UEP would also: expand economic opportunity for those struggling with high medical bills, improve the quality of health care delivered to the poor, and put America’s finances on a permanently stable course.

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How to Lead in 2017

9th January 2017

Fast Company publishes a story on how to lead that focuses on three women and a kind-of-black guy, thereby showing that following their advice will not result in heading a major corporation, most of whom are bossed by people who are white and male.

Karli Kloss is pretty hot, though; I predict success for her, although I suspect that leadership won’t have a lot to do with it.

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When Should [sic] the Federal Government Own Land?

9th January 2017

Tyler Cowen, a Real Economist, takes a gander.

Overall, I don’t see why the federal government needs to own about 28% of the country.  Nonetheless, in the meantime the government does allow grazing and mining to take place on those lands, often at below-market rents.  (By the way, for now I am putting on hold a possible #6: “federal land ownership is the most efficient way to regulate mining and fossil fuel extraction.”  It raises issues far beyond the scope of the current discussion, though it is significant.)

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California as Alt-America

9th January 2017

Joel Kotkin makes some observations.

In 1949 the historian Carey McWilliams defined California as the “the Great Exception” — a place so different from the rest of America as to seem almost a separate country. In the ensuing half-century, the Golden State became not so much exceptional but predictive of the rest of the nation: California’s approaches to public education, the environment, politics, community-building and lifestyle often became national standards, and even normative.

More’s the pity.

Ironically, the state’s policies, which place strong controls on development, road construction, and energy production and usage, are somewhat symbolic; by dint largely of its mild climate, the state is already far more energy efficient than the rest of the country.  But to achieve its ambitious new goals,  most serious observers suggest, the state would lose at least 100,000 jobs and further boost energy prices — which  disproportionately affect the poorer residents who predominate in the state’s beleaguered, and less temperate, interior.

The impact of these policies would be far-reaching. They have already reduced outside investment in manufacturing to minuscule levels and could cost California households an average of $3,000 annually. Such economic realities no longer influence many California policymakers but they could prove a boon  to other   states, notably Texas, Arizona and Nevada, which make a sport of hunting down California employers.

Eventually Caliornia will find out what failed states such as those in Eastern Europe found out before them: The problem with socialism is that eventually you run out of other people’s money.

According to the most recent Social Science Research Council report, the state overall suffers the greatest levels of income inequality in the nation; the Public Policy Institute places the gap well over 10 percent higher than the national average.

Isn’t it funny that the most Democrat places in the country — New York, California — are also the poster children for ‘income inequality’? I wonder why that is? Hmm, let me think….

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We Visited Obama’s New Wall

9th January 2017

Read it. And watch the video.

As you might have heard, Obama is building a wall around his upscale rental in D.C.’s Kalorama neighborhood.

The video doesn’t appear to work for me — much like Obama, come to think of it.

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We Are Not the World

8th January 2017

Greg Ip takes notice.

The new nationalist surge has startled establishment parties in part because they don’t see globalism as an ideology. How could it be, when it is shared across the traditional left-right spectrum by the likes of Hillary Clinton, Tony Blair, George W. Bush and David Cameron?

But globalism is an ideology, and its struggle with nationalism will shape the coming era much as the struggle between conservatives and liberals has shaped the last. That, at least, is how the new nationalists see it. After successfully pressuring Carrier Corp. to keep in Indiana about half of the 2,100 jobs that the firm had planned to move to Mexico, Mr. Trump told a rally last month, “There is no global anthem, no global currency, no certificate of global citizenship. From now on, it’s going to be ‘America First.’ ”

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Mark Hamill Has Begun Dubbing Donald Trump’s Tweets as the Joker

8th January 2017

Read it.

I always wondered why, when Harrison Ford went on to become a huge star and even Carrie Fisher managed to find work, Mark Hamil just sat on his butt and did nothing of note.

Now we see that he really was just useless all along.

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British student killed after falling from high-rise building in Tokyo

8th January 2017

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An “exceptional” British student has died after reportedly plunging to his death from a high-rise building in Tokyo on New Year’s Eve following an evening spent drinking with friends.

I can certainly believe that he was exceptionally foolish.

Justin Browning, 21, a third year student at Durham University, was spending a year studying at the Waseda University in Tokyo as part of his history degree when the tragedy occurred.

Oh, I think ‘tragedy’ a bit strong — think of it as evolution in action. Natural selection works even when you might not want it to.

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Smiles for Free Trade

8th January 2017

Read it.

While I agree that the Federal Reserve today has a comparative advantage at supplying currency to the global economy, I disagree that this reality is bad for Americans.  In fact, it’s good for Americans – very good.  The reason is that we receive from foreigners a steady flow of valuable goods and services in exchange for inexpensive monochrome portraits of dead American statesmen (or their even-less-costly-to-produce digital equivalents).

I am reminded of a scene in the third Jason Bourne movie, where Bourne is in Moscow and needs to go to the address of the daughter of the couple he killed in his first job. He shows up at a cab rank and asks if anyone can take him to the address that he shows them. Sceptical faces all around. Finally one says, ‘Rubles?’ and Bourne answers ‘Dollars.’ Suddenly all is smiles, and they’re on their way.

American Presidents have power, even after they’re dead.

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Thought for the Day

8th January 2017

Non Sequitur

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Thought for the Day

7th January 2017

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Fake News

7th January 2017

The OFloinn takes a look.

On the visceral level, the casual TV viewer on the evening news — and this is most viewers — is left with only the vague impression of Democratic leadership gathered around a poorly-designed sign reading “Make America Sick Again.” This is a heck of a motto with which to associate one’s party. It is only in the fine print that one sees that they blame the Republicans for doing this; but who reads the fine print in a 15-second sound bite on the evening news? As an ad slogan even a neophyte on Madison Ave. could come up with something ten times better.

On the rational level, the ad’s failure is worse. People do not get sick because they lack health insurance. They get sick because they contract diseases or suffer injuries. The lack of insurance affects the ability to pay for the care, but that is a different problem.  In fact, a major reason why many people had foregone insurance in the past was that, being young and healthy, they saw no need for the expense. That did not account for all of the uninsured, but it was a big chunk of them. Nor is it true that Americans were especially sick before the Obama administration determined to subsidize the insurance industry.

I can’t wait to hear Scott Adams’ take on this.

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Japan’s Female Hunters Take Aim at Stereotypes – and Wild Boar

7th January 2017

Read it.

Perhaps that’s why they don’t have an immigration problem.

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People Keep Finding Coins in Their MacBooks and Nobody Knows Why

6th January 2017

Read it.

I do.

I could tell you, but then I’d have to kill you.

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Don’t Thank Big Government for Medical Breakthroughs

6th January 2017

Read it.

The assumption seems to be that the root of all medical innovation is university research, primarily funded by federal grants. This is mistaken. The private economy, not the government, actually discovers and develops most of the insights and products that advance health. The history of medical progress supports this conclusion.

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Apple Cuts Tim Cook’s Salary, Cites Weak Performance

6th January 2017

Read it.

Well, if he’s short of eating money, he can always step outside his office to one of the free-food courts at Apple HQ.

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Thought for the Day

6th January 2017

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Orthodox Christmas: When Does Russia Celebrate It and Why is the Date Different Around the World?

6th January 2017

Read it.

Not discussed: What possible reason you might have for caring about that.

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Those Sweet, Surly Bonds of Earth

6th January 2017

James Miller is not afraid to ask the hard questions.

Sara Seager is a brilliant astrophysicist at M.I.T. who is dedicated to discovering more earthlike planets in the universe. Her life’s work has been committed to finding habitable planets light-years away from our own lowly blue home in the Milky Way.

The unasked but pertinent question here is: More visible to whom? Seager seems to be operating under the assumption that any contact with aliens is a good thing. Her optimism is untempered with caution. Has she not seen Independence Day, Mars Attacks!, or The Day the Earth Stood Still? If we can’t count on foreigners on our own terrestrial rock to be peaceful, what chance is there that nonhumans will be less hostile?

Why take a chance? That’s all we’re sayin’.

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Greek And Italian Food Makes You Smarter, Scientists Say

5th January 2017

Read it.

That’s why Greeks and Italians rule the world! Oh, wait….

That’s why there are so many Greek and Italian Nobel Prize winners! Oh, wait….

That’s why the Greek and Italian economies are on top! Oh, wait….

(What would we do without ‘scientists’?)

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Thought for the Day

5th January 2017

Non Sequitur

And remember that the toilet roll dispenses OVER, not UNDER.

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Adding Up the Cost of Uncontrolled Immigration

5th January 2017

Harvard’s George J. Borjas brings the settled science.

For decades Borjas has been shocking the system in his own way, arguing—carefully, with the support of intricate statistical analysis—that immigration comes with tradeoffs, particularly reduced wages for the native workers who compete with immigrants.

To most academics, that’s heresy. To many others it might sound like common sense—and at last we can experience Borjas’s ideas in a widely accessible form. After focusing for years on academic research, Borjas is bringing his findings directly to the public through a new book called We Wanted Workers, a rejuvenated blog (gborjas.org), and the occasional op-ed in mainstream publications such as Politico.

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Report: Clinton Mulling NYC Mayoral Run

5th January 2017

Read it.

Well, that would pretty much put the nail in the coffin for New York City.

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Education and Politics

5th January 2017

Alberto Mingardi riffs on a Kevin Williamson article.

In the 19th century, people of a liberal bent tended to support a wider franchise because they maintained that if everybody had a say in decision-making, the quality of decisions would go up. It was easy for kings and aristocrats to send a country to war: they had limited skin in the game, as they tended to observe the battlefield from distance. Let those who are going to die for the king’s honour and pride decide; they might prove more aware of the costs of their rulers’ decisions.

But a big part of the argument for democracy was in fact an argument for a better informed political discussion. Those who believed in expanding the franchise also believed in popular education and a wider diffusion of political gazette. Democracy and mass literacy should lead us towards saner policies: to become better able to engage the government as intellectually prepared citizens.

Here we are. Does better education really make politics saner?

I would argue: Yes, if it really is education. But what we have today isn’t education, but indoctrination, less obtrusive and therefore more insidious than what occurred in Soviet Russia, Nazi Germany, and other totalitarian states.

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Chuck Norris Versus Communism

5th January 2017

Economist Alex Tabarrok takes a look.

Chuck Norris Versus Communism is a great documentary about art, the power of heroes and the end of communism in Romania. After the communist regime was established in 1948, travel was restricted, the media were censored and the secret police watched everyone. Romania was cut off from the rest of the world. In the mid-1980s, however, smuggled VHS tapes of American movies began to circulate. Underground groups would gather together to watch samizdat movies like Rocky and Lone Wolf McQuade.

The action was exciting but perhaps even more revealing were the ordinary scenes of supermarkets stocked with food, at a time when Romania was racked with severe rationing. City lights, beautiful cars, and the ordinary freedoms of worship and belief casually portrayed all impressed on the Romanian viewers the starkness of their own situation.

I am reminded of the scene from Moscow on the Hudson where a Russian defector, played by Robin Williams, goes into a grocery store and asks where is the line for bread? The clerk says, ‘There is no line for bread. Bread is on aisle 4.’ Williams hyperventilates and passes out at the sight of forty feet of shelves with nothing but bread on them — and no line.

Makes you wonder how all the people who prefer socialism to a free market can be so stupid.

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Meme-tic

4th January 2017

Sarah Hoyt vents.

For four generations now, most people were taught Marxist/progressive shibboleths as though they were the revealed truth of the universe. Even teachers who don’t realize that’s what they’re teaching tend to drip through concepts like class struggle and the idea history comes with an arrow pointing at a progressive future, and even the idea of the Government as a benevolent entity that solves all things and fixes all things, from society to science.  Of course most of all the educational-industrial complex sells the idea that it’s wonderful, indispensable, and you should definitely give it way more of your money.

The problem is that when people go out into the world, they keep being forced into situations where this isn’t true, and where their nose is rubbed into the fact that what they were taught is nonsense.  Some (most perhaps) avoid thinking about it or acculturating by becoming bitter and cynical and deciding the world is irredeemable because it doesn’t match their head-picture.  And some fight back with memes.

Memes are perfect for this, because, like proverbs, they have the feeling of revealed truth and therefore stop the discomfort of having to face, you know, real reality which doesn’t match received culture.

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Know Your Shit

4th January 2017

Read it.

Practice makes perfect.

With thanks to Debby Witt — no, I have no idea where she finds this crap.

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Fearless Forecasts for 2017

4th January 2017

The OFloinn shows you the way.

My favorite:

The Talking Heads of the MSM will continue to explain to the public the inexplicable loss of the election by the Space Princess. They will continue to natter on about Russian interference (without specifying what that interference actually consisted of) and about Angry Misogynistic White Men (without discovering any large upwelling either of males or whites among the tallied votes). No one will mention triple digit increases in the price of health insurance under the “Affordable” Care Act or the proposal of a No-Fly Zone over Syria, where the Russians constituted the primary fliers — and hence of the palpable risk of a shooting war with Russia. A few folks in Otto’s Bar and Grille, where the Talking Heads are explaining things, will put down their beers and say, “Ain’t you the folks who were so wrong about who was going to win? So why should we listen to you now?” The Talking Heads have no good answer, and so they talk louder. Everyone stops listening to them.

Runner-up:

The New Witch Hunts will continue as people purge themselves on anti-social media by confessing the sins of other people, often creating these sins de novo from rumors and snippets of quotes. A few will long for the days when confession was under the seal of secrecy. The New Donatists will declare more sins to be lifelong unforgivables and will denounce those who forgive as being haters and ‘phobes.

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Choose Your Words Wisely

4th January 2017

Steve Sailer looks behind the curtain.

A paradox of the current nationalist rebellion is how worldwide it is. Three years ago, I pointed out in Takimag in a column entitled “Nationalism Is a Blast”:

In 2014, the global winds are blowing in favor of conservative nationalism.

One reason it’s happening over much of the planet is because the various establishment elites have become so homogenous [sic] in their ideology, unconsciously egging each other on into more extremism. For example, after the normally cautious Angela Merkel made her historic refugee blunder in 2015, Hillary Clinton repeatedly endorsed Merkel’s foolhardiness, even as the German leader herself came to regret her imprudence.

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I’m Fact-Checking Your Brain, Dude

3rd January 2017

Joe Bob Briggs checks the facts.

Using fact-checking as a weapon is like using your own Breathalyzer results to say somebody else is drunk.

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Obama’s Last Report Card

3rd January 2017

Kevin Williamson does the review.

In the eight years of his presidency, we have both abandoned and re-invaded Iraq, launched new engagements in the Middle East and in Africa, and contributed mightily to the mess in Syria with President Obama’s empty talk of “red lines” and sundry ultimata, none of which was taken seriously in Damascus — or Moscow, or Tehran, or Beijing, or Washington, for that matter. The United States and Russia are at the moment engaged in an escalating tit-for-tat confrontation over Moscow’s minor-league meddling in the presidential election, which is, of course, what President Obama really cares about: Vladimir Putin can annex Crimea and test out new weapons on civilians in Syria, but release a bucket of embarrassing DNC e-mails (the veracity of which is, incidentally, not in dispute) and the Obama administration swings into action.

Obama’s record at home is no more impressive. He punted his health-care reform bill to his team in Congress, where the fine legislative minds of Nancy Pelosi and Harry Reid oversaw the creation of what the president proudly called “Obamacare,” which has created absolute chaos in the health-insurance market. The artificial marketplaces it created are collapsing, insurers are abandoning the program, premiums and deductibles are skyrocketing, consumers have fewer choices rather than more numerous ones, Medicaid is swollen, and the American people, who elected Barack Obama in no small part because they thought he could apply that cool intelligence for which he was famous (at least in the pages of the New York Times) to the health-insurance mess, absolutely hate what he has done. The Affordable Care Act almost certainly will be undone in the coming months, and the people who supported Barack Obama will be happy to see it go.

An amazing record. Obama has done the impossible: Saved Jimmy Carter from being the worst U.S. President in the last 100 years.

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John Christy Climate Video

3rd January 2017

Read it. And watch the video.

John Christy is the Alabama State Climatologist and a climate scientist with the University of Alabama. In 1991 he received the NASA Medal for Exceptional Scientific Achievement for his contribution to global temperature monitoring. In 1996 he received a special award from the American Meteorology Society.

You want climate science? We got your climate science, right here.

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Your Body Is Your Brain Too

2nd January 2017

Scott Adams Reveals All.

When I am not feeling good, I don’t ask my brain to fix things on its own. I manipulate my environment until my thoughts change. That’s because I see my body as the user interface to my brain. I don’t let my brain think whatever it randomly wants to think. I constrain it to productive thoughts by manipulating my environment.

To convince yourself that my framework is valid, take an inventory of the people in your life who are unhappy. Ask some questions about what they are doing about their unhappiness. Rarely will the person say they are working on their body to fix their minds.

Now take an inventory of your more well-adjusted friends. Watch the degree to which they manipulate their bodies to manage their minds. Once you see the pattern, you will start to see it everywhere.

I just changed your life. You won’t know how much until later.

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