DYSPEPSIA GENERATION

We have seen the future, and it sucks.

Archive for the 'Think about it.' Category

Unbuilt Los Angeles: The City That Might Have Been – in Pictures

29th May 2017

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Albrecht Speer could not be reached for comment.

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Thought for the Day

29th May 2017

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No Burritos For You!

29th May 2017

Jim Goad takes on The Burrito Kerfuffle.

I’m not a fan of Mexican food, for reasons which should be obvious. Although I hold Mexicans in the highest esteem as a proud and noble (if exceedingly short) people, they tend to score poorly on standardized tests and have never invented much of note beyond nachos. I can’t think of a single Mexican comedian, musician, writer, or filmmaker who’s inspired me. To put it bluntly, I’ve never appropriated anything from them because I’ve never wanted to.

I never eat food from a place where more people are moving here from there than are moving there from here. I figure they know something I don’t, and the food is the chief suspect.

Portland, OR is one of the best American cities to enjoy from a distance. After all, it hosted what is easily one of my Top Three Favorite Hate-Crime Hoaxes of all time in the person of one Azalea Cooley, an allegedly cancer-stricken, wheelchair-bound black lesbian who wound up being the person who, when all was said and done, turned out to be the Mystery Klansman who was burning crosses in her own backyard.

Plus the rain. Don’t forget the rain.

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The Curious Rise of the ‘White Left’ as a Chinese Internet Insult

28th May 2017

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If you look at any thread about Trump, Islam or immigration on a Chinese social media platform these days, it’s impossible to avoid encountering the term baizuo (??), or literally, the ‘white left’. It first emerged about two years ago, and yet has quickly become one of the most popular derogatory descriptions for Chinese netizens to discredit their opponents in online debates.

Although the emphasis varies, baizuo is used generally to describe those who “only care about topics such as immigration, minorities, LGBT and the environment” and “have no sense of real problems in the real world”; they are hypocritical humanitarians who advocate for peace and equality only to “satisfy their own feeling of moral superiority”; they are “obsessed with political correctness” to the extent that they “tolerate backwards Islamic values for the sake of multiculturalism”; they believe in the welfare state that “benefits only the idle and the free riders”; they are the “ignorant and arrogant westerners” who “pity the rest of the world and think they are saviours”.

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Terrorism Is Not Random

28th May 2017

Kevin Williamson points out some inconvenient truth.

Tim McVeigh was God’s gift to the Left, and the Left will forever keep his memory alive, tending it like a kind of sacred flame.

Al-Qaeda attacks the United States on September 11, 2001? Yes, but don’t forget about McVeigh. Omar Mateen lets loose an “Allahu akbar!” before massacring 49 people at a gay bar in Orlando? Yes, but remember McVeigh. Salman Abedi and his pack of “lone” wolves get a jump on Ramadan by nail-bombing a bunch of little girls and their grandmothers at a concert in Manchester? Terrible, of course, but let us not forget about the real threat: right-wing terrorism on the McVeigh model.

We were, impossible as it sounds to say it, in one sense lucky to have al-Qaeda as our main terrorist threat in the years immediately following September 11, 2001. Al-Qaeda was, as an ideological matter, focused on spectacular attacks when it came to the West, desiring each to be more dramatic than the last. Osama bin Laden et al. found 9/11 difficult to follow up on, especially with U.S. forces hunting them down in their safe havens. The Islamic State has no such ideological limitation, and it is happy to bomb a concert here and behead a hostage there. The mullahs in Iran may dream of a nuclear Armageddon, but the Islamic State would be perfectly satisfied with a permanent intifada being fought in every Western city of any consequence.

 

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Why Everything We Know About Salt May Be Wrong

27th May 2017

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But of course the ‘consensus’ on Global Warming is incontrovertible.

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The Truth Will Set You Free… and We Can’t Be Having That, Now, Can We?

27th May 2017

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The amount of censorship on the Internet seems to be increasing. Most of it is not implemented overtly by Western governments — with Germany being a notable exception — but by supposedly private outfits. Facebook and Twitter hold near-monopolies in their specific markets, so that when they decide to censor, their actions are as effective as a government clampdown. And in Germany, of course, the government actually requires them to censor. Geert Wilder’s account was recently blocked in Germany, presumably in obedience to Angela Merkel’s orders.

But Twitter is quite willing to institute censorship on its own initiative, as in the recent case when the account for WorldNet Daily was suspended. If your opinions veer too far from the Narrative, and you become prominent enough that your tweets and posts are often “trending”, then in all likelihood you will eventually be squashed.

Check Scott Adams’ blog where he talks about getting shadowbanned on Twitter.

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Writing English as a Second Language

27th May 2017

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I’ll start with a question: What is good writing?

It depends on what country you’re from. We all know what’s considered “good writing” in our own country. We grow up immersed in the cadences and sentence structure of the language we were born into, so we think, “That’s probably what every country considers good writing; they just use different words.” If only! I once asked a student from Cairo, “What kind of language is Arabic?” I was trying to put myself into her mental process of switching from Arabic to English. She said, “It’s all adjectives.”

Well, of course it’s not all adjectives, but I knew what she meant: it’s decorative, it’s ornate, it’s intentionally pleasing. Another Egyptian student, when I asked him about Arabic, said, “It’s all proverbs. We talk in proverbs. People say things like ‘What you are seeking is also seeking you.’” He also told me that Arabic is full of courtesy and deference, some of which is rooted in fear of the government. “You never know who’s listening,” he said, so it doesn’t hurt to be polite. That’s when I realized that when foreign students come to me with a linguistic problem it may also be a cultural or a political problem.

William Zinsser has forgotten more about good writing than you will ever know.

First, a little history. The English language is derived from two main sources. One is Latin, the florid language of ancient Rome. The other is Anglo-Saxon, the plain languages of England and northern Europe. The words derived from Latin are the enemy—they will strangle and suffocate everything you write. The Anglo-Saxon words will set you free.

How do those Latin words do their strangling and suffocating? In general they are long, pompous nouns that end in –ion—like implementation and maximization and communication (five syllables long!)—or that end in –ent—like development and fulfillment. Those nouns express a vague concept or an abstract idea, not a specific action that we can picture—somebody doing something. Here’s a typical sentence: “Prior to the implementation of the financial enhancement.” That means “Before we fixed our money problems.”

Believe it or not, this is the language that people in authority in America routinely use—officials in government and business and education and social work and health care. They think those long Latin words make them sound important. It no longer rains in America; your TV weatherman will tell that you we’re experiencing a precipitation probability situation.

And that’s a lot of the problem with America today. Churchill said it best: ‘Short words are best; and old words, when short, are best of all’. (Of course, he always did.)

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Death in the Clouds: The Problem of Bodies on Everest

27th May 2017

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No one knows exactly how many bodies remain on Mount Everest today, but there are certainly more than 200. Climbers and Sherpas lie tucked into crevasses, buried under avalanche snow and exposed on catchment basin slopes – their limbs sun-bleached and distorted. Most are concealed from view, but some are familiar fixtures on the route to Everest’s summit.

Perhaps most well-known of all are the remains of Tsewang Paljor, a young Indian climber who lost his life in the infamous 1996 blizzard. For nearly 20 years, Paljor’s body – popularly known as Green Boots, for the neon footwear he was wearing when he died – has rested near the summit of Everest’s north side. When snow cover is light, climbers have had to step over Paljor’s extended legs on their way to and from the peak.

Think of it as evolution in action.

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Teachers Must Ditch ‘Neuromyth’ of Learning Styles, Say Scientists

27th May 2017

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Teaching children according to their individual “learning style” does not achieve better results and should be ditched by schools in favour of evidence-based practice, according to leading scientists.

Thirty eminent academics from the worlds of neuroscience, education and psychology have signed a letter to the Guardian voicing their concern about the popularity of the learning style approach among some teachers.

Demonstrating how short a life a ‘scientific consensus’ has as a reflection of reality.

The group opposes the theory that learning is more effective if pupils are taught using an individual approach identified as their personal “learning style”. Some pupils, for example, are identified as having a “listening” style and could therefore be taught with storytelling and discussion rather than written exercises.

The letter describes that approach as “one of a number of common neuromyths that do nothing to enhance education”. It is signed by Steven Pinker, Johnstone family professor of psychology at Harvard University; Dorothy Bishop, professor of developmental neuropsychology at the University of Oxford; and leading neuroscientist Prof Uta Frith of University College London among others.

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Study: Physically Weak Men More Likely to Be Socialist, Strong Men More Likely to Be Capitalist

26th May 2017

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Not really news, but a timely reminder.

Explains why Obama throws like a girl, though.

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Thought for the Day

26th May 2017

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Thought for the Day

25th May 2017

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Kosher Pizza War Simmers On After Brooklyn Rabbis Rule

24th May 2017

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Enough about Trump, let’s look at something important.

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8 Things Successful People Do When They Don’t Like Someone

22nd May 2017

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Hire Tony Soprano to have them whacked.

Well, that’s what I would do.

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Time to End Presidential Press Briefings?

22nd May 2017

Scott Adams does a review.

Personally, I enjoy watching Sean Spicer spar with the press. It’s good entertainment. But press briefings don’t make sense in 2017. And they certainly don’t make sense for a Trump presidency. I’ll tell you why.

The role of press briefings is to create two complementary illusions. The first illusion is that the administration is providing new and useful information. That rarely happens. And when it does, it could have been done more easily in the form of a press release in response to a written inquiry. A written response can be faster than a press briefing because it doesn’t depend on a scheduled meeting time in the future.

The second illusion created by the press briefings is that “news” is being manufactured in that room. The reality is that artisanal “gotcha” moments are lovingly crafted by the press. That means the so-called news from press briefings is generally fake news, and that would be true no matter the administration in power.

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Gelato vs. Ice Cream

22nd May 2017

Lion of the Blogosphere sorts it out for you.

Gelato is just the Italian word for ice cream, and while there are customary differences between them, I don’t think that there exists an ice cream/gelato police that will put you in prison if you call standard American-style ice cream “gelato” to make it more appealing to SWPLs. You see, SWPLs love stuff that’s European and usually despise eating foods commonly eaten by Amercian proles unless it’s eaten ironically. Although there seems to be an exception for ice cream, a food that spans social classes and can be unironically enjoyed by SWPLs even though they have a preference for the fancier-sounding gelato.

I’ve always preferred sherbet to ice cream. It’s the Turk in me.

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Will Trump Be Israel’s Redeemer?

22nd May 2017

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They’ll have to oil him up first.

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Severed Heads

22nd May 2017

Victor Davis Hanson looks at Washington.

Far too many government officials never pay the price for their crimes and misdeeds: Clinton, Rice, Napolitano, Lerner … Comey is the exception.
President Trump’s firing of James Comey revealed strange timing, herky-jerky methods, and bad political optics.
Certainly, in the existential political war that Trump finds himself in, it would have been wiser, first, to have rallied his entire White House team and congressional leaders around the decision and established a shared narrative, to have been magnanimous to the departing James Comey, and to have had obtained private guarantees from a preselected successor that he or she would serve and be appointed within a day or two.
But otherwise the firing was overdue.
The head of the FBI (quite outside his purview as an investigatory official) announced in summer 2016 to the nation that he had decided not to seek an indictment of Hillary Clinton. Then, again in the role of a presumed federal attorney, he seemed to reverse that judgment by reopening his investigation. Then he appeared to re-reverse that decision — all at the height of a heated presidential campaign.

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The Mozambique Drill: A History And How To

22nd May 2017

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Most people who have been exposed to defensive shooting techniques have heard the little slogan, “Two to the body, one to the head, is guaranteed to leave them dead.” Fewer shooters know this refers to a defensive shooting technique called the Mozambique Drill. But a large number of defensive students may be confused regarding the difference between the Mozambique and the Failure Drill. Well, as they say, here is the rest of the story.

I learned it as ‘Two to the body, one to the head, always leaves the target dead.’ But it’s core knowledge however construed.

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World Championships in Medieval Combat Comes to Denmark

22nd May 2017

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The event is taking place at Spøttrup Castle, a well-preserved 16th century fortress, and is part of the line-up for European Capital of Culture Aarhus 2017. The medieval combat will include one-on-one contests to large skirmishes, where teams of 16 people fight with swords, axes, clubs and warhammers.

Whilst the championships take place, the parkland around Spøttrup Castle will be converted into a Medieval market, selling everything from chain mail to mead. At the castle one can experience the entertainment up close while discovering some medieval gourmet as a real warrior, to the sounds of wild battle cries and metal on metal.

Everything old is new again.

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South African Hunter Theunis Botha Crushed to Death by Elephant After It Is Fatally Shot in Zimbabwe

21st May 2017

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Theunis Botha, 51, from Johannesberg, was leading a hunt in Gwai, Zimbabwe, when they stumbled across a herd of elephants, which included pregnant cows.

Three elephants stampeded towards the hunters and Mr Botha opened fire with his rifle, prompting a fourth elephant to storm in from the side and lift him up with her trunk.

The Afrikaans news site Netwerk24 reported that another member of the group fired the fatal shot at the elephant and, as the animal collapsed dead, she fell on Mr Botha.

Usually karma isn’t that speedy.

Let that be a lesson to us all.

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Explaining Academia: Milieu Control, Part I

21st May 2017

Severian sets it out in black & white.

Milieu control is a basic mind-control tactic. Severely restrict the environment, and you limit the mental world of its inhabitants. Robert Jay Lifton’s Mind Control and the Psychology of Totalism is still the best primer on how this is done. He identifies eight factors for successful “brainwashing.” Lifton’s subjects were American POWs from the Korean War and former Chinese labor camp inmates, but stop me if this sounds familiar.

The new Clerisy has many characteristics resembling those of the First Estate of the French ancien regime prior to the French Revolution. Full of ill-paid people whose greatest pride is in their supposed intellectual prowess and conviction of moral superiority, they take comfort in feeling that they have given up the pomps and comforts of the secular world in order to Fight The Good Fight against the Forces of Evil and Darkness. Their comparative hand-to-mouth existence compared to the affluent of the Crust induces feelings of resentment that they express by dealing dirt to the Usual Suspects on the right By Any Means Possible. The college students that are shouting down people who don’t agree with them and walk out of graduation exercises rather than listen to thoughts that are Politically Incorrect are their recruiting ground.

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Turkey’s Brilliant Tow Trucks Put the U.S. to Shame

21st May 2017

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Great tools for stealing cars.

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Financialization

21st May 2017

ZMan brings the future.

One of the things that ails us in the modern age is we have yet to adjust our thinking to the modern economy. The great political-economic thinkers lived in a time when money was either gold, backed by gold or a fiat currency. The result is our political and economic debates are based in the logic of a world that no longer exists. The modern global economy is not based on fiat money or hard money. It is based on credit money, which has a unique set of characteristics.

For instance, the US government is no longer able to print up greenbacks and sprinkle them on the economy. Instead, when they expand the money supply, they expand lending, both domestic and global. It’s not just any sort of lending either. The central bank can buy up long term notes in order to drive down long term lending rates, thus expanding lending for capital goods. Alternatively, they can buy up short term debt and increase the amount retail lending. The Federal Reserve holds close to 2 trillion in mortgages, for example.

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Things Are Going to Be Fine

21st May 2017

P. J. O’Rourke tells us how he sees it.

“The politician creates a powerful, huge, heavy, and unstoppable Monster Truck of a government,” P.J. O’Rourke writes in his new book, How the Hell Did This Happen? (Atlantic Monthly Press). “Then supporters of that politician become shocked and weepy when another politician, whom they detest, gets behind the wheel, turns the truck around, and runs them over.”

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Thought for the Day: The Problem With Democracy

21st May 2017

Gallery: Matt cartoons, May 2017 

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Thought for the Day: The Buttinsky Effect

21st May 2017

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Far too many people operate according to a screwy and uncivilized code of ethics.  Butting in to strangers’ private affairs is applauded as altruistic if done through the agency of the state, while resisting and protesting against such officiousness is portrayed in the media and in the classrooms as evidence of greed or of cruelty or of ignorance (or of some combination of the three).

Making matters much worse are the all-too-typical modern economists.  They thrill to the not-very-challenging challenge of pointing out the many ways that real-world markets ‘deviate’ from textbook models – and in particular of all the many situations in which flesh-and-blood individuals acting in markets are less than fully informed.  These economists then leap, stuffed with confidence but devoid of anything at stake, to the conclusion that they – and the state officials who they imagine are eager to act on their scientific advice – somehow know, or can make known, all that the flesh-and-blood people are presumed not to know about the details of each of these individual’s specific situations.

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The Short Attention Span President

20th May 2017

Scott Adams teaches the world.

Part of the fun of watching the press cover President Trump is that they don’t have a leadership filter. Most writers and TV news people have never been leaders in super-complicated industries. President Trump has. And let me tell you a few necessary skills a leader in that situation needs to possess:

1. No patience with long explanations. If an advisor can’t put the USEFUL information in summary form, ignore and move to the next advisor.

2. Ability to know which variables are sufficient to make the decision.

A president needs those two qualities. Otherwise, the job would overwhelm. if you are one of the advisors who doesn’t get enough attention from the president – because your explanations of things are overly wordy or useless – what message do you leak to the press?

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Thought for the Day: Obstruction of Justice

20th May 2017

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Common Mistakes to Avoid When Cooking With Butter

19th May 2017

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If you’re not cooking with butter, then the angels will weep for you.

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Friday Thoughts

19th May 2017

Lion of the Blogosphere shares.

Trump’s trip to Saudi Arabia presents good possibilities for positive press. No doubt it causes cognitive dissonance for Democrats that the Arab countries like Saudi Arabia are very happy that Trump is President, because they hated Obama. They don’t care about Trump’s “Muslim ban,” because they don’t let Jews and Christians immigrate to their countries, why do they care if the United States does the same to their people, as long as they can all get along diplomatically? The Middle East simply does not understand the do-gooder liberal ethic at all. They think they’re a bunch of chumps. They love to take advantage of those chumps, but they have no respect for them.

I try to be cynical but it’s impossible to keep up.

 

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Thought for the Day

19th May 2017

Someday, Batman

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“Charles Murray is once again peddling junk science about race and IQ”

18th May 2017

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Let’s see, who is more likely to be peddling ‘junk science’, a distinguished academic who publishes the research on which his conclusion are based, or writers for a partisan web site who depend on ‘fairly wide consensus among behavioral scientists’?

As with any such issue, the proper response is SHOW YOUR WORK. We can see Murray’s — he put it in a book, which has been out (and subject to checking) for decades. ‘Consensus’ isn’t evidence, it’s just opinion. SHOW YOUR WORK. Give us the data on which you base your opinions. Point out exactly where Murray’s data are wrong. Don’t just wave your hands about how All Right-Thinking People Agree And So That Answers The Question. SHOW YOUR WORK. This is science, after all. (Or is it…?)

For the lazy, Steve Sailer fisks this hatchet-job here.

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RIP Roger Ailes

18th May 2017

‘Remember this about America: Everybody is trying to get in, and nobody is trying to get out.’ — Roger Ailes

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Thought for the Day

18th May 2017

Gallery: Matt cartoons, May 2017 

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Dutch King Willem-Alexander Reveals Secret Flights as Co-Pilot

18th May 2017

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I hope he got paid.

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Prof to White Male Employees: ‘Please Quit’

17th May 2017

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A professor wants universities to “stop hiring white cis men,” according to her May blog post uncovered by Campus Reform Wednesday.

“If you are a cis white man (meaning you identify as male and you were assigned male at birth) you almost certainly should resign from your position of power,” wrote Piper Harron, a temporary assistant professor at University of Hawaii at Manoa.

“That’s right, please quit. Too difficult? Well, as a first step, at least get off your hiring committee, your curriculum committee, and make sure you’re replaced by a woman of color or trans person. Don’t have any in your department?  HOW SHOCKING.”

Racism from the Left, strait up. And yet Trump is the New Hitler.

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Move Over, San Francisco: Dallas Tops Our List of the Best Cities for Jobs 2017

17th May 2017

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It’s a region that in many ways is the polar opposite of the San Francisco and San Jose metropolitan areas, which have dominated our ranking for the last few years. (They still place second and eighth this year, respectively, among the largest 70 metropolitan areas, though San Jose is down sharply from second place last year.)

Unlike the tech-driven Bay Area, Dallas’ economy has multiple points of strength, including aerospace and defense, insurance, financial services, life sciences, data processing and transportation. Employment in the metro area has expanded 20.3% over the past five years and 4.2% last year, with robust job creation in professional and business services, as well as in a host of lower-paid sectors like retail, wholesale trade and hospitality.

According to Southern Methodist University’s Klaus Desmet and Collin Clark, Dallas’s success stems in part from the fact that it isn’t looking to appeal to the elite “creative class,” but to middle-class workers and the companies and executives who employ them. Dallas attracts both foreign and domestic migrants, particularly from places like California, where housing is, on an income-adjusted basis, often three times as expensive. This has had much to do with the relocation to the area of such companies as Jacobs Engineering, Toyota, Liberty Mutual and State Farm.

Suck on it, Left Coast.

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Stop Fiddling With Your Goddamn Phone

17th May 2017

Joe Bob Briggs lays down the law.

And why is it called a smartphone? It’s not smart, it’s a computer. It’s dumb. It requires a smart person to operate it. It’s probably called a smartphone to disguise the fact that it’s likely to be operated by a dummy, thereby making it more marketable to consumers in need of remedial IQ points.

When Steve Jobs arrived at the gates of heaven, Gabriel was not there to greet him, there were no trumpets, and the gates remained closed all day, because the archangels were fiddling with their phones.

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Putin Does a Trump

17th May 2017

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On Wednesday, Putin jokingly said of Lavrov, “I will have to reprimand him because he shared these secrets neither with me nor with the Russian secret services which is very inappropriate on his part.”

Waiting for the Russian media to call for his impeachment. Oh, wait….

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Thought for the Day

17th May 2017

http://www.savagechickens.com/wp-content/uploads/chickenparties.jpg

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Why Korean Companies Are Forcing Their Workers to Go by English Names

16th May 2017

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Surely Trump is to blame, somehow; or maybe George W. Bush.

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Wealthy Chinese Have Spent Billions of Dollars on Thousands of ‘Golden’ US Visas

16th May 2017

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Funny how Democrats are never in favor of this sort of immigration.

If we’re going to be overrun with foreigners, I’d rather they be rich Chinese than poor Mexicans.

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Trump, Our First MBO Presidency

16th May 2017

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I’ve worked closely with a few powerful CEOs in my life. Most were like Donald, energetic, fun to be around, and quite willing to believe and say just about anything with obvious conviction to make a serious point or promote their venture. I was there to encourage them to paint their pictures within the lines; that is to not get too far ahead or away from reality. More than once, during an analyst meeting or in a meeting with investors, I had to interject, carefully, to pull some of the hotter hyperbole, back to earth.

Donald Trump has no appreciation for this kind of retail politics. He’s a business guy, through and through, our first management by objectives CEO, the MBO President. What does he want? Control over our borders. It’s part of his job description and he’s determined to achieve it. And he wants the world to take our leadership seriously. He wants to reverse the diminution of our military. He wants fair trade deals. He wants a simplified tax code with lower rates. He wants elections unblemished by voter fraud. He wants our multinationals to repatriate their profits from overseas. He wants free, open and vibrant health insurance and health care markets. He wants a judiciary that considers constitutional intent, not precedent, first when judging our laws. That’s about it.

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What to Do If You Get Caught in an Avalanche

16th May 2017

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Hey, it could happen.

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Basic Income Is a Dead End

15th May 2017

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The most common reason cited for this conclusion is, of course, financing: though its costs have not been quantified, it is certain that they would be high. Just how income and wealth should be taxed to pay for it remains an open question. Radically transforming the social system to create a basic income would be the greatest financial gamble in recent history.

But the financial aspect is not even the most important argument against a basic income. Basic income is a seductive poison. It would benefit the margins of society at the expense of the middle class. For the poor and long-term unemployed, basic income would remove the pressure to find work and the unpleasant task of actively look for employment. It most likely would not cost the rich any more than before, and would help ease their conscience. Growing inequality would no longer be a social scandal, since everyone would have an income, albeit close to the poverty line. It is precisely for this reason that there are three main arguments against an unconditional basic income.

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Thought for the Day

15th May 2017

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The Rise of Cronyism

14th May 2017

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I object to the term ‘crony capitalism’ because cronyism has no structural connection to ‘capitalism’ (which is really just a shame-work that Marx invented to have a stick with which to beat free markets); if it did, then there wouldn’t be any cronyism under socialism, when real-world experience show that cronyism is even worse under socialism than under its alternatives.

Still, this is a good exposition of the fact that whenever government sticks its paws into economics it attracts cronyism as rotten food attracts maggots. This is why ‘rich’ people are so comfy with politicians who spend most of their time bashing ‘the rich’ — rich people know (a) they don’t really mean it, and (b) they know that whenever politicians actually do something that is anti-rich they soon get their asses handed to them.

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The Robots, AI, and Unemployment Anti-FAQ

14th May 2017

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An interesting point of view.

The problem with automation that might take it out of the general trend over recent centuries is that, unlike semi-skilled agricultural work being replaced by simi-skilled industrial work. semi-skilled industrial and service jobs are being eliminated but the newly-created jobs are highly-skilled service jobs that more often than not incorporate an education credential that the newly-unemployed don’t have and arguably won’t be able to get.

I love free markets as much as any man whomsoever, and I certainly hope that we survive this process as we have survived similar processes in the past, but I don’t see how we get from Point A to Point B.

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