DYSPEPSIA GENERATION

We have seen the future, and it sucks.

NASA: Biggest Cap of Antarctic Sea Ice Since 1979

9th October 2014

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How about that Global Warming, huh?

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Obama Slams Billionaires at the Home of a Guy Named Rich Richman

9th October 2014

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Richman, who built his $10 billion company developing rental housing, lives in the Conyers Farm area, where the minimum lot size is 10 acres. Twenty-five donors paid $32,400 each to get their photo taken with the president. Others paid $10,000 for dinner.

It’s like he’s not even listening to himself, but just reading from a teleprompter loaded by the cast of Saturday Night Live.

“If Republicans win, we know who they’ll be fighting for,” Obama said. “Once again, the interests of billionaires will come before the needs of the middle class.”

Those two sentences are correct, but not in the way he arranged them.

Obama arrived from New York City — where he had attended a fundraiser with hedge-fund billionaires George Soros and Paul Tudor Jones — in a convoy of four helicopters that landed at the Greenwich Polo Club.

Sometimes it is good to be the king, even King Putt.

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School Told to Call Kids ‘Purple Penguins’ Because ‘Boys and Girls’ Is Not Inclusive to Transgender

9th October 2014

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“Don’t use phrases such as ‘boys and girls,’ ‘you guys,’ ‘ladies and gentlemen,’ and similarly gendered expressions to get kids’ attention,” instructs a training document given to middle-school teachers at the Lincoln Public Schools.

I am not making this up.

Furthermore, it instructs teachers to interfere and interrupt if they ever hear a student talking about gender in terms of “boys and girls” so the student can learn that this is wrong.

This is the way we wash your brain, wash your brain, wash your brain….

Anybody who sends a kid to a government school is perpetrating child abuse.

The Other McCain blows the whistle:

The point is that this kind of radicalism can’t be contained to college campuses. Inevitably, the feminists who learn “gender theory” in Women’s Studies programs will want to implement those theories throughout society, including your local public schools — even in Nebraska!

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Why Academics Stink at Writing

9th October 2014

Steven Pinker turns over a rock.

Together with wearing earth tones, driving Priuses, and having a foreign policy, the most conspicuous trait of the American professoriate may be the prose style called academese.

No honest professor can deny that there’s something to the stereotype. When the late Denis Dutton (founder of the Chronicle-owned Arts & Letters Daily) ran an annual Bad Writing Contest to celebrate “the most stylistically lamentable passages found in scholarly books and articles,” he had no shortage of nominations, and he awarded the prizes to some of academe’s leading lights.

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Ebola, Electronic Medical Records, and Epic Systems

9th October 2014

Michelle Malkin blows the whistle.

Last week, Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital revealed in a statement that a procedural flaw in its online health records system led to potentially deadly miscommunication between nurses and doctors. The facility sent Ebola victim Thomas Duncan home despite showing signs of the disease—only to admit him with worse symptoms three days later.

Hospital officials, who came forward “in the interest of transparency,” initially cited workflow and information-sharing problems for the botch. “Protocols were followed by both the physician and the nurses,” the statement noted. “However, we have identified a flaw in the way the physician and nursing portions of our electronic health records interacted in this specific case.”

Mysteriously, after taking special care to get their facts straight before releasing the statement, the hospital backed off a day later. The very specific communications flaw in the medical records software—which apparently had prevented some staff from accessing Duncan’s travel history from Liberia—suddenly disappeared.

 

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More Than a Dozen States Plan to Cancel Health Care Policies Not in Compliance With Obamacare

9th October 2014

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“It looks like several hundred thousand people across the country will receive notices in the coming days and weeks,” said Jim Capretta of the Ethics and Public Policy Center.

The policies are being canceled because states that initially granted a reprieve at the request of President Obama are no longer willing to do so.

In coming weeks, 13 states and the District of Columbia plan to cancel such policies, which generally fall out of compliance with the Affordable Care Act because they don’t offer the level of coverage the law requires.

But if you like your doctor you can keep your doctor! Ha, ha — Just kidding….

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Investigator Claims He Was Told to Delay Secret Service Prostitution Report Until After Election

9th October 2014

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According to The Washington Post, David Nieland also said that he was instructed by his superiors in the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) inspector general’s office to “withhold and alter certain information in the report of investigation because it was potentially embarrassing to the administration.”

My, what a surprise! Aren’t you surprised? I’m sure surprised.

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Lead Poisoning in Rome – The Skeletal Evidence

8th October 2014

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Did lead poisoning cause the fall of the Roman Empire?  Probably not.

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UW Fusion Reactor Concept Could Be Cheaper Than Coal

8th October 2014

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Perhaps the biggest roadblock to adopting fusion energy is that the economics haven’t penciled out. Fusion power designs aren’t cheap enough to outperform systems that use fossil fuels such as coal and natural gas.

University of Washington engineers hope to change that. They have designed a concept for a fusion reactor that, when scaled up to the size of a large electrical power plant, would rival costs for a new coal-fired plant with similar electrical output.

Posted in News You Can Use. | 1 Comment »

Google Turned A Camel Into A Street View Car To Map The Liwa Desert

8th October 2014

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I am not making this up.

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Gallup: Number of Democrats Who Say Obamacare Hurt Them More Than Doubles

8th October 2014

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Chickens coming home to roost….

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The War For Oil Myth

8th October 2014

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If oil were a major factor for prosecuting war in Iraq, it stands to reason the United States would be getting substantial amounts of it. It may come as a shock to Greenwald as well as a number of other Americans, but with regard to importing oil, the overwhelming percentage of our imported oil does not come from the Middle East. Canada and Latin America provide the United States with 34.7 percent of our imported oil. Africa provides another 10.3 percent. The entire Persian Gulf, led by Saudi Arabia at 8.1 percent, provides us with a total of 12.9 percent of our imported oil.

As recently as December 2012, Iraq provided the United States with approximately 14.3 million barrels of oil out of a total of about 298 million barrels imported, or 4.8 percent of our total imports. And as this chart indicates, we were importing the highest amount of oil from Iraq before we went to war to oust Saddam Hussein.

Next time you see some idiot with a ‘No Blood For Oil’ shirt on, know that this is a great country in which even stupid people can vote.

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Council of Chalcedon

8th October 2014

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Memorandum that Orthodox Christians have been resisting Muslim aggression for 1400 years.

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Scripps College Uninvites George Will From Speaking

8th October 2014

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The political double standard for speakers on campus is reaching a tipping point. Many more people than you think are fully aware that a convicted cop killer is speaking at Goddard College while a Pulitzer Prize winning journalist has now been told he can’t speak at Scripps.

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The Secret of These New Veggie Burgers: Plant Blood

8th October 2014

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Patrick Brown, a 60-year-old Stanford University professor turned first-time entrepreneur, says he has found the secret to replicating the taste of red meat: plant “blood.”

On a recent afternoon in his company’s expansive laboratory, Mr. Brown poured a deep-red liquid into a plastic cup. The thin concoction looks like blood, has the same distinct metallic taste, and is derived from the molecule found in hemoglobin that makes blood red and steak taste like steak.

But this bioengineered blood comes from plants and is the crown jewel of Mr. Brown’s three-year-old company, Impossible Foods, which has so far created a hamburger that looks, feels, tastes and cooks almost like the real thing.

Ewwww.

Posted in News You Can Use. | 1 Comment »

Finally, a Heat-To-Electricity Device Powerful Enough for The Old-School Energy Giants

8th October 2014

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Startup Alphabet Energy is billing its new product, announced on Tuesday, as the world’s first industrial scale thermoelectric generator, which means it is powerful enough to be used at remote oil, gas and mining sites. Called the “E1,” the device uses the latest in material science and nanotechnology to capture waste heat from the exhaust stack of a diesel generator, and the material inside converts that heat into usable electricity.

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ESPN Hires Michelle Obama’s Brother 5 Months After Firing From Coaching Job

7th October 2014

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Robinson was fired from his head basketball coaching job in Oregon State in May with three more years remaining on his contract.

ESPN coordinating producer Chris Farrow praised Robinson as a “credible” voice to the cable giant’s college basketball coverage, citing his “experience at the Division I coaching level,” as well as his “insight and understanding of the game.”

And if you believe that one, they’ll tell you another one.

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They Are Coming for Your Children

7th October 2014

Kevin Williamson turns over a pretty big rock.

Contrary to all of the sanctimony surrounding them, the government schools are in fact the single most destructive institution in American public life, and they are the bedrock of the Left’s power, providing billions of dollars in campaign contributions and millions of man-hours for Democratic campaigns. But they do more than that: They are the real-life version of those nightmarish incubator pods from The Matrix, and home-schooling is a red pill. We entrust our children to the state for twelve or thirteen years, during which time they are subjected to a daily regimen that is, like the school buildings themselves, more than a little reminiscent of the penitentiary: “bells and cells,” as one of my teachers used to call it. They are instructed in obedience and compliance, as though the most important skill in life were the ability to sit quietly and follow instructions; those children who are more energetic than the authorities care for are given psychiatric diagnoses and very often put on psychiatric drugs: Since the 1980s, the rate of antidepressant prescription for children has increased five-fold, while the rate of antipsychotic prescription has increased six-fold. Locking children up for the largest part of the day, in a dreary room with 20 to 30 other children all born within nine or ten months of each other, is a model that make sense — that is something other than insane — only if you think of children as batches — if you believe, as our president and those who share his views believe, that the children are the government schools’ product rather than their customers.

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Fewer Men Are Working, and Marriage Is Dying

7th October 2014

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In a marriage based society, getting sexual access to the most attractive women requires men to work hard to signal provider status.  After the wedding, men feel the responsibility which comes with the position of head of the household.   Both of these are extremely powerful incentives for men to work hard and maximize their earnings.  However, we have moved from a marriage based/incentive structure for men to a quota/coercion based society.  As a result, we are seeing a shift in men’s attitudes about work.

Pretty soon only homosexuals will bother getting married.

Freeberg connects the dots:

Progressives have done the same thing with fatherhood that they’ve done with charity: Taken the spirit out of it, made it into a system of obligatory payments to some agent that may or may not have the trust of the person making the payments; but, they’re obligatory so what does it matter.

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Battle of Lepanto

7th October 2014

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The defense against militant Islam is not a new thing.

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What Do We Mean When We Talk About Inequality?

7th October 2014

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Amartya Sen, the Nobel Prize-winning economist, famously argued that since everyone favors equality of one sort or another, the key question is: Equality of what? A fierce argument in the wonkosphere over income inequality illustrates the need to be clear on this point.

It’s really very simple: It means that person X has more then person Y when the speaker doesn’t think that person X deserves to have more than person Y.

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Pot Calling the Kettle . . . White?

7th October 2014

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BLUF: Editorial from the New York Times criticizes Apple, Google, and Facebook for employing mostly white and Asian males contains link to the New York Times editorial board which is (wait for it) mostly white males.

The Times says it is a “problem” that “Most [Silicon Valley] employees are white and Asian men.” So let’s count! Sure enough, 11 of the editorial board’s 19 members are white or Asian men. Worse, only one out of 19 is African-American. That’s a little under one-half the proportion of African-Americans in the population. How about a Rooney Rule for the New York Times?

You can’t make this stuff up.

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Thought for the Day

7th October 2014

But as I was sitting there listening to them, I realized that there were certain things that no one would dare to say out loud in front of that group. Everyone in the room was white, so as a thought experiment, I imagined myself saying in a conversational manner, “You know, I really prefer the company of white people.” Fortunately, I never act on such foolish impulses. If I had, I almost certainly would have been asked to leave.

Yet a black person who an expressed a preference for his own race would not have been sanctioned. His statement wouldn’t even draw much attention. It’s racist for a white person to prefer white people, but not for blacks to feel the same about their own race. There’s no symmetry to the rules.

When the full nature of these rules is teased out and exposed to the light of day, the irrational absurdity of the whole business is plain for all to see. It must remain a Thing That Cannot Be Said, because saying it brings the reigning cultural paradigm to full consciousness, where everyone can realize just how stupid and harmful it is.

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Watchdog: Up to $200 Million Missing After Lax UN Oversight of Afghan Police

7th October 2014

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Lax U.N. oversight of the international fund to pay Afghan National Police salaries has contributed to the diversion of up to $200 million by Afghanistan’s Interior Ministry for questionable practices, according to a U.S. watchdog agency.

My, what a surprise! Aren’t you surprised? I’m sure surprised.

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The Bacon Boom Was Not an Accident

6th October 2014

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In the past decade, bacon has grown into an industry generating more than $4 billion in annual sales. It has moved from a breakfast meat to a food trend touching an incredible array of consumer goods, both edible and not, from bacon-heavy fast-food burgers and bacon-infused desserts at fine dining restaurants to bottles of bacon-distilled vodka and even a sexual lubricant formulated to smell (and taste) like bacon. More than cupcakes, ramen, or kale, bacon has become the defining food trend of a society obsessed with food trends.

Oh, more than just a trend, I think.

Bacon has been a staple of the American diet since the first European settlers, but until recently it was consumed in a predictable, seasonal pattern. The bulk of sales came from home consumers, diners, and pancake houses, which fried it up along with eggs for breakfast. “For a long time bacon was sold 80 percent at retail and only 20 percent in food service,” says Leathers, who worked selling and marketing pork to both supermarkets and restaurants over the decades. In summer, sales would spike along with the annual tomato crop—peak season for Cobb salads, BLTs, and club sandwiches. When the tomatoes ran out by October, bacon retreated to the breakfast table till the next summer. The pork belly futures contract was born at the Chicago Mercantile Exchange in 1961 as a result of this cycle: Farmers with an excess supply of pork bellies sold them to cold storage warehouses, thus locking in a price long before tomato season hit. Pork belly traders made money speculating on the spread between the price of bellies on those contracts and the price they got when they finally sold the frozen meat to a smokehouse, where it was made into bacon.

There is no time when bacon is inappropriate.

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Freedom From Food

6th October 2014

More on Soylent from one of the chattering classes.

Posted in Think about it. | 3 Comments »

The Vacuity of the Political “We”

6th October 2014

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When politicians say “We need to do X” or “We’ll have to start doing Y”, ask them whether they have a mouse in their pocket.

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10 Things the College Admissions Office Won’t Tell You

6th October 2014

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Some of these are obvious. Some of them are painful.

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Welcome to Mexifornia

6th October 2014

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A Saturday morning debate between Rep. David Valadao (R-CA) and his Democratic challenger, Amanda Renteria, was hosted in Spanish, the Fresno Bee reports.

The debate, hosted by Univision Fresno at Fresno State in Bakersfield, Calif., the Fresno Bee wrote, was “conducted entirely in Spanish.”

Be careful not to step in the diversity.

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Pakistan 1: The Blasphemy Laws

6th October 2014

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From the early 1970s, I have always been fascinated by Islam, and had visited Morocco, Tunisia, Egypt, Turkey, Syria, Jordan, Central Asia, and Western China amongst many other places to photograph mosques, tombs and other examples of Islamic architecture. In those days, I had the mistaken belief that Islam was a parallel faith to Christianity, and that adherents of both religions worshipped the same God. What I saw, heard and read during and after my visits to Pakistan dispelled this view and drove me headlong into the anti-Islam and counter jihad lobbies where I remain today.

Posted in Living with Islam. | No Comments »

‘Where’s the global warming?’ Expert Says Public Are Growing Sceptical of Climate Change

6th October 2014

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You can’t fool all of the people all of the time.

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Connecticut Targets Homeschoolers

5th October 2014

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In Connecticut, Governor Dannel P. Malloy’s Sandy Hook Advisory Commission has returned a curious and controversial draft recommendation: the state should increase its oversight of homeschooled children with emotional or behavioral challenges. The proposal has outraged the state’s homeschoolers, who, like homeschoolers everywhere, are keenly aware of their sometimes conditional freedoms. In Connecticut, as elsewhere, the law allows parents to homeschool if they choose. But the practice has always been viewed as threatening by left-wing academics, social architects, and teachers’ unions—all well represented on Malloy’s 16-member panel. Sadly, this is only the most recent assault on the rights of Connecticut homeschoolers.

‘Everything in the State, nothing outside the State, nothing against the State.’ — Benito Mussolini

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When Narcissism Becomes Deadly

5th October 2014

Bob Belvedere lays down some inconvenient truth.

As I’ve written many, many times: you cannot consider yourself Muslim unless you believe in this, because The Koran is the direct word of Allah and cannot be questioned.  There can be no Moderate Islam, in the sense we understand moderation.  There is no gray.

Posted in Living with Islam. | 1 Comment »

Pennsylvania Seniors Express ‘Shock’ Over Premium Jumps Due to Obamacare

5th October 2014

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Remember that next time elections roll around, people. This isn’t rocket science.

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The Latest Culinary Fad: Famine Food

5th October 2014

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Unfortunately, for many of our remote ancestors, the absence of effective transportation, such as railroads and container ships, meant that they had no choice but to survive on a local diet and, in the process, put all their agricultural eggs into one geographical basket. This was always a recipe for disaster. The Roman poet Virgil in his Georgics described how, in bad years, weeds invaded the land, voles and mice spoiled the threshing floor, cranes and geese attacked the crops, goats ate the young vines, and moles, toads and ants each feasted on or undermined the farmer’s work. (Virgil could also have discussed fungus, insect pests and other problems.) Of course, whatever survived these pests could be damaged or wiped out by summer droughts and winter windstorms, as well as snow, hail or heavy rain. Even in good years, Virgil observed, a field might be accidentally set on fire.

No matter the location or agricultural system, local food for local people not only meant that most people struggled with famine and malnutrition – it also meant many were well aware of the undomesticated local plants they could use as either supplementary or emergency food sources. In the words of economic historian Peter Garnsey: ‘Peasants have always been systematic foragers on uncultivated land [including fallow fields], in woods, marshes and rivers.’ (1) Indeed, for the average European peasant, with the exception of poisonous or very bitter plants, ‘anything that grew went into the pot, even primrose and strawberry leaves’ (2). According to a recent survey, despite their absence from official statistics and the ‘routine underestimation’ of their importance, many ‘wild foods’ are still ‘actively managed’ by nearly one billion people whose annual income would probably not pay for one evening’s dining at NOMA or Coi.

The fact that food snobs now need to revert back to the famine foods of old should not be viewed as an indictment of our modern food production system, but rather as astounding proof that, today, that system feeds middle-class consumers better than most kings in history. Far from wearing sustainable adornments, all the emperors of SOLE food really offer us in the end is an unaffordable witch brew that caters to the palates of people with too much time and money on their hands.

Posted in You can't make this stuff up. | No Comments »

The Case for Delayed Adulthood

5th October 2014

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ONE of the most notable demographic trends of the last two decades has been the delayed entry of young people into adulthood. According to a large-scale national study conducted since the late 1970s, it has taken longer for each successive generation to finish school, establish financial independence, marry and have children. Today’s 25-year-olds, compared with their parents’ generation at the same age, are twice as likely to still be students, only half as likely to be married and 50 percent more likely to be receiving financial assistance from their parents.

A Voice of the Crust argues, as you would expect, that the prolonged immaturity that modern culture fosters (conveniently feeding as many people as possibly into dependency) is actually a good things. Any resemblance to the introductory sequences of The Hunger Games is purely coincidental, of course.

This is too pessimistic. Prolonged adolescence, in the right circumstances, is actually a good thing, for it fosters novelty-seeking and the acquisition of new skills.

For ‘novelty-seeking’, read ‘circuses’. For ‘new skills’, read ‘the constant search for something, anything, that will allow us to get a job’. The problem with the ‘new skills’ mirage is that success in life depends on some very old skills indeed, skills that today’s prolonged adolescents aren’t getting.

Studies reveal adolescence to be a period of heightened “plasticity” during which the brain is highly influenced by experience. As a result, adolescence is both a time of opportunity and vulnerability, a time when much is learned, especially about the social world, but when exposure to stressful events can be particularly devastating. As we leave adolescence, a series of neurochemical changes make the brain increasingly less plastic and less sensitive to environmental influences. Once we reach adulthood, existing brain circuits can be tweaked, but they can’t be overhauled.

So the Clerisy want to keep young people as plastic as possible for as long as possible, in the hopes of producing the New Soviet Man, or at least a sufficiently reasonable facsimile that will support, rather than challenge, the Crust.

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Machine Learning Is Teaching Us the Secret to Teaching

5th October 2014

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When Pyotr Stolyarsky died in 1944, he was considered Russia’ s greatest violin teacher. He counted among his pupils a coterie of stars, including David Oistrakh and Nathan Milstein, and a school for gifted musicians in his native Odessa was named after him in 1933. But Stolyarsky couldn’t play the violin anywhere near as well as his best students. What he could do was whisper metaphors into their ears. He might lean over and explain how his mother cooked Sabbath dinner. His advice gave no specific information on what angle the bow should describe, or how to move the fingers across the frets to create vibrato. Instead, it distilled his experience of the music into metaphors his students could understand.

 

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Steve Jobs Was a Low-Tech Parent

5th October 2014

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I was perplexed by this parenting style. After all, most parents seem to take the opposite approach, letting their children bathe in the glow of tablets, smartphones and computers, day and night.

Yet these tech C.E.O.’s seem to know something that the rest of us don’t.

I never asked Mr. Jobs what his children did instead of using the gadgets he built, so I reached out to Walter Isaacson, the author of “Steve Jobs,” who spent a lot of time at their home.

“Every evening Steve made a point of having dinner at the big long table in their kitchen, discussing books and history and a variety of things,” he said. “No one ever pulled out an iPad or computer. The kids did not seem addicted at all to devices.”

Sometimes the old ways are best.

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Shrink-Wrapping Spacesuits

5th October 2014

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The concept of a skin-tight form-fitting spacesuit has long been common in science fiction; now people are actually building them.

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Scotland: The Hole in the Lifeboat

5th October 2014

John Derbyshire, Patron Saint of Dyspepsia, does what he does best.

A mere lifetime ago George Orwell could write of England having “a culture as individual as that of Spain.” Today’s England—and the rest of the British Isles is very little better—has a culture about as individual as that of an airport departure lounge.

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Robots Work Their Way Into Small Factories

5th October 2014

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At Panek Precision Inc., a Northbrook, Ill., machine shop, 21 shiny new robots hum as they place metal parts into cutting machines and remove the parts after they are done. It’s a tedious and oily task once handled by machine operators who earn about $16.50 an hour.

One new robot doubled the output from a machine that was previously operated by a worker “because robots work overnight and don’t take lunch breaks and they just keep going,” says Gregg Panek, the company’s president. In some cases, the robots, which are single articulated arms, can even hold a part while it’s getting cut since there is no danger of injury.

Raise that minimum wage! Get more robots in here!

One thing still holding back the trend is fear. Some managers worry that workers will view the machines as competitors for jobs and fight their installation.

No shit.

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Reality Is Viciously Sexist

5th October 2014

Eric Raymond lays out some inconvenient truth.

Males have, on average, about a 150% advantage in upper-body strength over females. It takes an exceptionally strong woman to match the ability of even the average man to move a contact weapon with power and speed and precise control. At equivalent levels of training, with the weight of real weapons rather than boffers, that strength advantage will almost always tell.

Firearms changes all this, of course – some of the physiological differences that make them inferior with contact weapons are actual advantages at shooting (again I speak from experience, as I teach women to shoot). So much so that anyone who wants to suppress personal firearams is objectively anti-female and automatically oppressive of women.

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How the Suburbs Got Poor?

5th October 2014

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Yet another analysis of why suburbs suck by somebody who has never lived in a suburb.

You might be wondering why poor families are moving to the suburbs in large numbers—the number of suburban poor grew more than twice as quickly as the number of urban poor between 2000 and 2011—if they are such hard places for poor people to get ahead. Part of it is that as middle- and high-income households moved to the suburbs, the low-wage workers who look after their children had little choice but to follow. Then there is the fact that as America’s most productive cities experience a revival, gentrification is displacing low-income families to outlying neighborhoods and towns.

Note the assumption that anybody who is not already ‘low-income’ necessarily has ‘low-income’ people ‘who look after their children’. Bzzt! Wrong. The people who have low-income people to look after their kids are the Crustian professionals who both have professional jobs and rarely have more than one kid in the first place; this author’s view of ‘suburb’ means Scarsdale or Darien, not Ferguson.

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HAPPY DANCE SUNDAY

5th October 2014

Everyday Is a Winding Road

Posted in Dystopia Watch, Is this a great country, or what? | No Comments »

The Walrus and the Climate Hysterics

5th October 2014

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The “walrus crisis” is the Left’s latest effort to bully us into electing Democrats. Because…they’re going to do something about the walruses, I guess. Hard to say what. Chase them back onto the ice, maybe.

Koo koo kachoo.

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Visual Latin

4th October 2014

Watch it.

Next to math and touch-typing, Latin has been the most useful thing I have ever studied. Better than half of the really interesting and useful words in the English language came from Latin. Go through a newspaper or magazine article and cross out the words that come from Latin, and you aren’t left with much.

(I remember my first day of Intensive Beginning Greek at Yale; the instructor went around the room and asked why we wanted to study Greek, all 12 of us. My snotty answer was “To be civilized.” He said, “No, you study Latin to be civilized. You study Greek to be educated.” And he was right. That’s your next step.)

Any language that is ridiculed by Eddy Izzard has to be good for something.

And, to get you started: An appropriate book.

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How Archerfish Use Physics to Hunt With Their Spit

4th October 2014

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In which they are not unlike journalists and politicians.

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First Womb-Transplant Baby Born

4th October 2014

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Anti-discrimination legislation and preferences for government programs are no doubt under preparation.

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An Apple a Day Could Keep Obesity Away

4th October 2014

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Not that there’s anything wrong with that, you weightist bigot.

The tart green Granny Smith apples benefit the growth of friendly bacteria in the colon due to their high content of non-digestible compounds, including dietary fiber and polyphenols, and low content of available carbohydrates.

Reason enough, I suggest, to avoid them. My wife favors Gala apples, about which I have not heard any vile rumors of healthful effect.

Posted in Think about it. | 1 Comment »

Tobacco Plant May Be Key to Ebola Drugs

4th October 2014

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You will note that there were no cases of Ebola before the anti-smoking bigots took over the Clerisy. Coincidence? I think not.

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