We have seen the future, and it sucks.

The Magic of Education

28th November 2011

Bryan Caplan tells the truth about education.

I’ve been in school for the last 35 years – 21 years as a student, the rest as a professor.  As a result, the Real World is almost completely foreign to me.  I don’t know how to do much of anything. While I had a few menial jobs in my teens, my first-hand knowledge of the world of work beyond the ivory tower is roughly zero.

And the same goes for the vast majority of professors, especially in ‘humanities’.

Yes, I can train graduate students to become professors.  No magic there; I’m teaching them the one job I know.  But what about my thousands of students who won’t become economics professors?  I can’t teach what I don’t know, and I don’t know how to do the jobs they’re going to have.  Few professors do.

Treasure this moment of honesty.

Many educators sooth their consciences by insisting that “I teach my students how to think, not what to think.” But this platitude goes against a hundred years of educational psychology. Education is very narrow; students learn the material you specifically teach them… if you’re lucky.

Other educators claim they’re teaching good work habits. But especially at the college level, this doesn’t pass the laugh test. How many jobs tolerate a 50% attendance rate – or let you skate by with twelve hours of work a week? School probably builds character relative to playing videogames. But it’s hard to see how school could build character relative to a full-time job in the Real World.

One Response to “The Magic of Education”

  1. Bob Says:

    Excellent article. I wish more college professors were as honest as this guy.