DYSPEPSIA GENERATION

We have seen the future, and it sucks.

Archive for November, 2011

Gingrich and Immigration

30th November 2011

Thomas Sowell pees on Newt Gingrich. Can’t say he didn’t have it coming.

Let’s go back to square one. The purpose of American immigration laws and policies is not to be either humane or inhumane to illegal immigrants. The purpose of immigration laws and policies is to serve the national interest of this country.

There is no inherent right to come live in the United States, in disregard of whether the American people want you here. Nor does the passage of time confer any such right retroactively.

Posted in Think about it. | Comments Off

iPhone Gets Built-in Bottle Opener in Opena Case

30th November 2011

Read it.

Can a folding screwdriver and penknife blade be far behind?

Posted in Is this a great country, or what? | 2 Comments »

Strikes Chaos? Passengers at Heathrow Get VIP Treatment

30th November 2011

Read it.

The lesson seems clear: Unions go on strike = life gets more pleasant for everybody.

Posted in Think about it. | Comments Off

Australian Navy Officer in Spanking Scandal

30th November 2011

Read it.

Gotta love Australians.

The real surprise is that it involved a female sailor — these days, that’s unusual.

Posted in News You Can Use. | Comments Off

Maldives: UN Human Rights Commissioner’s Criticism of Flogging Under Sharia Results in Facebook Group to See Her “Slain and Driven Out of the Country”

30th November 2011

Read it.

‘Don’t call us violent or we’ll kill you.’

That’s some fine Religion o’ Peace™ you got there, Mohammed.

Posted in Living with Islam. | Comments Off

Fluorescent Spray Could Help Surgeons Identify Cancer Quickly

30th November 2011

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Pepper-spray your cancer — maybe it will leave. Why not? It could happen.

Posted in News You Can Use. | Comments Off

Cat Scan Used to Recreate 307-Year-Old Stradivarius Violin

30th November 2011

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The process still requires the craftsmanship and care of a skilled luthier in assembling the instrument, but Dr. Sirr sees the process as an opportunity for ordinary musicians to have access to the world’s most treasured instruments at a fraction of the price.

We have the technology.

Posted in News You Can Use. | Comments Off

The Cognitive Benefits Of Chewing Gum

30th November 2011

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Chewing without eating seems like such a ridiculous habit, the oral equivalent of running on a treadmill. And yet, people have been chewing gum for thousands of years, ever since the ancient Greeks began popping wads of mastic tree resin in their mouth to sweeten the breath. Socrates probably chewed gum.

Useful news, that’s what we’re all about.

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What Would Palmerston Do?

30th November 2011

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Upon receiving the news that the British embassy in Tehran had been stormed, its windows smashed, and the Union Jack ignominiously burned and replaced with an Iranian counterpart, a question popped into my mind: What would Lord Palmerston do?

Posted in Think about it. | 1 Comment »

Why Congress Can’t Save the Postal Service

30th November 2011

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Proposals to cut Saturday service and close underused post offices in order to save billions of dollars have met united opposition from Democrats and many of the conservative Republicans who swept into office campaigning on smaller government.

Cornell University associate professor Richard Geddes compared efforts to save the postal service to the closures of under-used military bases. In concept, lawmakers support closing unneeded facilities — just not those in their own congressional districts.

 

Posted in Your tax dollars at work - and play. | 1 Comment »

Kidnapper Sues Former Hostages, Says They Broke Promise

30th November 2011

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Jeez, you can’t trust anybody these days.

Posted in You can't make this stuff up. | Comments Off

Nigeria: At Least 45 Christians Reported Killed in Recent Weeks by Muslim Herdsmen and Soldiers

29th November 2011

Read it.

That’s some fine Religion o’ Peace™ you got there, Mohammed.

Posted in Living with Islam. | Comments Off

Marmite: Profile of a Yeast-Based Spread

29th November 2011

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What vegetarianism eventually leads to. Without eternal vigilance, it could happen here.

Posted in Think about it. | 1 Comment »

Curing the Unemployment Blues

29th November 2011

Richard Epstein lays out some inconvenient truth.

One of the enduring faiths of modern progressive thought is that omniscient policy makers can cancel out the errors of one form of economic intervention by implementing a second. That lesson was brought home to me when I was a third year student at Yale Law School, whenever discussion turned to the perennial debate over the minimum wage. The charge against the minimum wage was that it had to introduce some measure of unemployment into labor markets by raising wages above the market-clearing price. “Not to worry,” came the confident reply. The way to handle that imperfection is to raise the level of welfare benefits in order to remove the dislocations created by the minimum wage. If one government program had its rough edges, a second government program could ride to the rescue. Implicit in this argument was the tantalizing, but fatal, assumption of economic abundance: The government has the power to tax, and with that power, has access to a cornucopia of public funds that never runs empty—at least until it does.

And such arguments tend to ignore basic principles of economics in the sure and certain knowledge that whenever basic economic principles cough up an undesirable result, a government-applied patch can take care of it. Inherent in this approach is the assumption that each of these result-patch pairs is discrete and independent — that everything else will stay the same as a part is tweaked here and a part is tweaked there. This is obvious nonsense for a dynamic system like an economy, but it’s astonishing how thoroughly this pervades public policy discussions. A good example is the ‘static scoring’ used by government accountants to justify taxes that (a) don’t raise the predicted revenue and (b) have other unpleasant consequences as people modify their behavior accordingly. Funny how that works. Or the blathering by various OccupyStupidity drones who think that a static snapshot of income levels at any one particular time is a valid basis for ‘redistributing’ said incomes.

The massive level of economic dislocation both at home and abroad offers conclusive evidence that this venerable two-part strategy does not, and cannot work. Pinpointing its systematic errors is critical to avoid expanding on past mistakes. The proper approach is simple to state but hard to execute: Always seek “first-best” solutions. The correct response to any restriction on capital or labor is its prompt removal. A “second-best” effort to introduce some offsetting program only makes matters worse. The two errors do not cancel out. They cumulate.

Adjustments that a free market would make automatically and efficiently are made by government regulatory apparatchiks only slowly, inefficiently, and far too often wrongly.

Posted in Think about it. | Comments Off

Why Are So Many Terrorists Engineers?

29th November 2011

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They say they believe in freedom and share our values. They say a few bad apples shouldn’t bring down judgment on their entire kind. Don’t be fooled. Though they walk among us with impunity, they are, in the words of Henry Farrell, a political scientist at George Washington University, “a group that is notoriously associated with terrorist violence and fundamentalist political beliefs.”

They are engineers.

Yet another politically unfashionable group to worry about. Note that the guy raising the alarm is not an engineer.

Actually, this isn’t hard to figure out: Engineers are just as permeated by their cultures as anybody else; unlike Queer Studies majors, though, they actually build stuff that works.

Posted in Axis of Drivel. | 1 Comment »

Turn On the Server. It’s Cold Inside.

29th November 2011

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TO satisfy our ever-growing need for computing power, many technology companies have moved their work to data centers with tens of thousands of power-gobbling servers. Concentrated in one place, the servers produce enormous heat. The additional power needed for cooling them — up to half of the power used to run them — is the steep environmental price we have paid to move data to the so-called cloud.

Well, of you left-wing assholes would allow us to build nuclear power plants, it wouldn’t be a problem. Nuclear power plants have no environmental price except in the fever dreams of Jane Fonda and her crowd.

Two researchers at the University of Virginia and four at Microsoft Research explored this possibility in a paper presented this year at the Usenix Workshop on Hot Topics in Cloud Computing. The paper looks at how the servers — though still operated by their companies — could be placed inside homes and used as a source of heat. The authors call the concept the “data furnace.”

I am not making this up.

Posted in News You Can Use. | 1 Comment »

WashPost: Legal Immigrants Are ‘Unlikely Foes of Md. Dream Act’

29th November 2011

Read it.

That’s right — once more we’re talking about an article that is talking about an article that is talking about a situation. But I offer no apologies, because (as with political and military intelligence) knowing how we come to find out about something is often as interesting as the something itself.

In this case, we have a major news organization (The Washington Post) which (in theory) ought to be reporting (i.e. telling us the facts) about a situation — which it does, after a fashion, but in a way that would (I suggest) cause an objective observer to wonder whether this organization is really qualified to do what it is nominally in business to do (give people the facts).

Now, anybody with any knowledge of the legal process by which foreigners enter this country legitimately (and that knowledge isn’t difficult to acquire) will appreciate that it’s like pushing a rope through an acre of quicksand. (I’m shocked, shocked, I tell you….) And so it doesn’t take any great stretch of imagination to suppose that those who have successfully navigated this Confidence Course might resent the ‘queue-jumpers’ who don’t bother to wait their turn or touch all the bases.

Yet the entire tone of the Washington Post article is cast in the form of a ‘man bites dog’ story, as if this possibility had not even occurred to Pamela Constable, the reporter, and her editors. Even worse, it is written from the perspective of an assumption that it would just as certainly not have occurred to the supposed readers of the article. (We all do this. We don’t tell our friends about the weird thing that happened to us on the way to work unless we think that they’ll find it equally weird.)

‘Aha! Liberal media bias!’ Yeah, that seems clear. And it’s bothersome in at least two ways.

What if the reporter had decided not to report on this particular story? After all, we don’t tell our friends about every weird thing that happens on the way to work; only stuff that’s really really weird; or if we have sufficient leisure to cover the only slightly weird. So this story could easily have gotten passed by, which means that the newspapers readers might not ever have heard about it. And these are folks that supposedly would have found it weird as well, this thing that an informed and objective observer would have found perfectly understandable. What other perfectly understandable things that they would have found weird are they not reading about, simply because it didn’t survive the level-of-weirdness filter of a particular reporter or a particular editor on a particular day at the Washington Post?

Equally disturbing: What other things are Washington Post reporters not reporting on, precisely because they are not weird in the view of the reporter or editor? It’s not a stretch to imagine that, since they apparently have a range of perfectly understandable things that they consider weird and thus ‘news’, there might also be a range of weird things that they think perfectly understandable and therefore ‘not news’.

So the information getting fed to the readers of the Washington Post gets filtered from two directions. And the readers of the Washington Post, the premier news organ of the nation’s capital, include the people who run the country. If that doesn’t bother you, then you haven’t been paying attention.

This is where we step up a level of abstraction and consider the Newsbusters article about the Washington Post article. It mocks the Post’s article (and rightly so) because of its biased coverage of a perfectly-understandable-thing-as-weird, but doesn’t even suggest the possibility that there might be bias in the other direction, the weird-thing-as-perfectly-understandable — and, in that, it’s coverage is incomplete.

Not that I have any room to talk; I do that sort of thing all the time here, typically because I have a day job and this is just a hobby for me, so my time is limited.

But I do like to bring up, when I can, the fact that no matter how thorough any coverage of an issue might appear to be, there’s always something that doesn’t get covered, and that un-covered something might be as important as (or even more important than) what got coverage.

Just sayin’.

Posted in Think about it. | Comments Off

Palantir, the War on Terror’s Secret Weapon

29th November 2011

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None of Fikri’s individual actions would raise suspicions. Lots of people rent trucks or have relations in Syria, and no doubt there are harmless eccentrics out there fascinated by amusement park infrastructure. Taken together, though, they suggested that Fikri was up to something. And yet, until about four years ago, his pre-attack prep work would have gone unnoticed. A CIA analyst might have flagged the plane ticket purchase; an FBI agent might have seen the bank transfers. But there was nothing to connect the two. Lucky for counterterror agents, not to mention tourists in Orlando, the government now has software made by Palantir Technologies, a Silicon Valley company that’s become the darling of the intelligence and law enforcement communities.

One can easily imagine two reactions to this story: (1) “Thank God we’re finally getting the tools needed to prevent future atrocities!'; (2) “Oh my God, Big Brother has finally arrived!’ And both would be correct, because it’s impossible to know beforehand what sort of picture ‘connecting the dots’ is going to produce.

The thing I find most disturbing about this illustrative scenario is that at no time has this subject done anything illegal, or even for which a perfectly innocent explanation is not just as likely as the one posited in the scenario. IF one approaches it with the assumption that ‘this is a terrorist planning a strike’, then his activities will point strongly in that direction. But if one does not approach it with that assumption, then these activities don’t necessarily compel that conclusion. There are a lot of people who go to Disneyland without enjoying themselves. (I’ve met a few.) People with foreign relatives often send them money. (If the guy’s name was Gonzalez, and his relatives in Mexico, nobody would think twice about it.)

This would seem to be another case where technology is enabling government oversight of personal activity to a degree not anticipated by current law, and I suspect that many in government are going to rejoice over their new toolbox without spending much time pondering what the appropriate limits on its use might be. The unfortunate aspect is, that those who would put such considerations at the top of their priority list are typically unaware of such new technological developments until they run across a news story about it, such as this one. If (as is often the case) the companies and agencies involved put forth an effort to keep this sort of thing out of the public eye — a typical argument being that to allow the existence of this technology to leak out will seriously impair its usefulness, and that’s a persuasive argument — then the chances of there being a serious discussion among interested parties about possible appropriate limits on its use grows vanishingly small. And that bothers me.

Posted in Dystopia Watch | Comments Off

$5.3B Goes to Students Who Government Says Don’t Need It

28th November 2011

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The schools use the money — more than 20% of all U.S. financial aid — to compete for applicants who have high grade-point averages and SAT scores. Some discounts serve another purpose: They lure high-income families that can write a check for the rest of the tuition.

My, what a surprise. Aren’t you surprised? I’m sure surprised.

Posted in Your tax dollars at work - and play. | 1 Comment »

Mystery Explosion Rocks Iran City

28th November 2011

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A large explosion has been reported in the Iranian city of Isfahan as the regime issued conflicting reports apparently designed to deny any suggestions of a sabotage attack on its nuclear facilities.

Not another one….

Pass the popcorn.

Posted in Think about it. | Comments Off

The Magic of Education

28th November 2011

Bryan Caplan tells the truth about education.

I’ve been in school for the last 35 years – 21 years as a student, the rest as a professor.  As a result, the Real World is almost completely foreign to me.  I don’t know how to do much of anything. While I had a few menial jobs in my teens, my first-hand knowledge of the world of work beyond the ivory tower is roughly zero.

And the same goes for the vast majority of professors, especially in ‘humanities’.

Yes, I can train graduate students to become professors.  No magic there; I’m teaching them the one job I know.  But what about my thousands of students who won’t become economics professors?  I can’t teach what I don’t know, and I don’t know how to do the jobs they’re going to have.  Few professors do.

Treasure this moment of honesty.

Many educators sooth their consciences by insisting that “I teach my students how to think, not what to think.” But this platitude goes against a hundred years of educational psychology. Education is very narrow; students learn the material you specifically teach them… if you’re lucky.

Other educators claim they’re teaching good work habits. But especially at the college level, this doesn’t pass the laugh test. How many jobs tolerate a 50% attendance rate – or let you skate by with twelve hours of work a week? School probably builds character relative to playing videogames. But it’s hard to see how school could build character relative to a full-time job in the Real World.

Posted in Think about it. | 1 Comment »

And What Does This Tell You?

28th November 2011

Time magazine covers.

Posted in Axis of Drivel. | Comments Off

‘Shoot Me Last’ Is Not a Viable Health-Care Business Strategy

28th November 2011

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Lobbying Congress to shift cuts to your competitors is no longer a viable option when IPAB will cap Medicare spending at GDP+1 (or, in the case of President Obama’s latest proposal, GDP+.5), and the cuts have to fall annually. Providers’ only solution is to stop seeing Medicare patients entirely, or to treat them as widgets and pump them into and out of the system as fast as you can — hardly a recipe for quality health care. The only real alternative is to embrace something like Chairman Ryan’s proposal for a defined-contribution structure for Medicare, and for the health-care sector as a whole (via tax reform).

Posted in Your tax dollars at work - and play. | 1 Comment »

The Road to 270: Team Obama Maps Out Their Victory Plan

28th November 2011

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Saddest sentence: ‘ But even in the Rust Belt, Democrats get a demographic bump: the CAP study shows a higher concentration of college educated whites in Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin versus 2008.’

Modern America: A country in which ‘college-educated white’ means ‘predictably stupid’. No wonder the economy is in the toilet; the people who ought to be running the place are playing Frisbee instead.

Posted in Dystopia Watch | Comments Off

Pagan Stone Circle Built at US Air Force Training Academy

28th November 2011

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The US military has built a stone circle in its Air Force academy to give pagans, druids and witches somewhere to practice their religion.

And read Fallen Angels by Jerry Pournelle et al. to find out how this story ends.

Posted in Dystopia Watch | 2 Comments »

The Unending Pakistani Wars

28th November 2011

Victor Davis Hanson speaks some inconvenient truth.

We probably will not know the full extent of the latest border clash between coalition forces and the Pakistani army, and it may not matter even if we do, given that we all seem to accept the strange post-9/11 relationship with ally/neutral/enemy Pakistan. In all these widely publicized military flare-ups there is a disturbing pattern: When Pakistani-trained, -supplied, -subsidized, or -harbored terrorists kill American soldiers, we are to accept that the government in Islamabad has no control over its wild lands and regrets terrorist and insurgent violence as much as we do. When, on the other hand, Americans either accidentally or in frustration strike back, then the usual street protests, government smears, and litany of threats follow from Pakistan — which are supposedly to pacify the Pakistani street, and yet by back-channel assurances not endanger the stream of American dollars flowing into the coffers of the Pakistani government elite and military. No better emblem of this was General Musharraf, who occasionally offered his ritual damnations of the U.S., while a large part of his family did pretty well living in America.

Posted in Living with Islam. | Comments Off

Scientists Behaving Badly

28th November 2011

Jim Lacey turns over a very large rock.

Global-warming skeptics spend much of their time knocking down the fatuous warmist claim that the science is settled. According to the warmists, this singular piece of settled science is attested to by hundreds or thousands of highly credentialed scientists. In truth, virtually the entire warmist edifice is built around a small, tightly knit coterie of persons (one hesitates to refer to folks with so little respect for the scientific method as scientists) willing to falsify data and manipulate findings; or, to put it bluntly, to lie in order to push a political agenda not supported by empirical evidence. This is what made the original release of the Climategate e-mails from the Climate Research Unit at the University of East Anglia so valuable. They clearly identified the politicized core of climate watchers who were driving the entire warmist agenda. Following in their footsteps are all the other scientists who built their own research on top of the fraudulent data produced by the warmist core.

Posted in Think about it. | Comments Off

Nigeria: Four Dead, Eight Churches Burned in Latest Round of Attacks in Northeast

28th November 2011

Read it.

That’s some find Religion o’ Peace™ you got there, Mohammed.

Posted in Living with Islam. | Comments Off

Large Families ‘Protect’ Mother’s Health

28th November 2011

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Having four or more babies may be good for you, research has shown, as mothers of large families were less likely to die of a stroke.

Well. There it is.

Posted in News You Can Use. | 2 Comments »

Law School Hiring (The Faculty Meeting–Appointments)

28th November 2011

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A little light humor to start your day. Don’t focus on the fact that it’s utterly accurate; just focus on the fact that these people are training the lawyers that (not coincidentally) are making your life (and mine) a living Hell.

Posted in Is this a great country, or what? | Comments Off

Why Clinton’s Biography Is Worse Than Bush’s: He Wrote It Himself

28th November 2011

Steve Sailer is shooting some post-Turkey-Day fish in a barrel.

On p. 6 of Back to Work, I tripped over a sentence of 85 words. Alerted, I began to keep track of Clinton’s XXXL-sized sentences. By page 20, I had found additional leviathans of 91, 105, 110, 98, 118, and a round 200 words. I decided to give up counting. But, then, on pp. 23-24, Clinton lets loose with a blue whale of a sentence comprising 346 words.

Cicero did that all the time — but then, he wrote in Latin; it’s doubtful Clinton could distinguish Latin from latte.

In the past, the Clintons have been notorious for not acknowledging their ghostwriters. For example, Simon & Schuster paid Barbara Feinman $120,000 to write It Takes a Village for Hillary Clinton, but the First Lady refused to mention Feinman’s name.

Shucks, I’d have done it for half of that.

 

Posted in Is this a great country, or what? | 1 Comment »

Truth in Advertising: Act Seeks to Place Warning Labels on Enhanced Photos

28th November 2011

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Critics of a controversial trend in advertising are proposing legislation that would force companies to inform customers when the models in their ads have been photoshopped in order to improve their appearance.

Coming soon: Legislation banning unrealistic plots and scenes in books, movies, and video games. And don’t get me started on Weight Watchers.

Seth Matlin is the founder of offourchests.com, the driving force behind the “Self Esteem Act,” which seeks to make consumers more aware of the digital enhancement that occurs in advertising.

‘Progressives’ are all about ensuring that your life as dreary as theirs.

Matlin believes that digitally enhanced advertising creates unrealistic expectations for young women and that advertisers are giving young girls the impression that they will never be good enough. He argues that by focusing on physical beauty, and by photoshopping already beautiful models, entire segments of the population are being excluded.

‘We’re going to enhance your self-esteem by making sure that you have no prayer of being anything other than fat, ugly, and stupid.’ The anti-Burger-King: Have it our way — or else.

Posted in Whose turn is it to be the victim? | Comments Off

Gigantic Baby ‘Jihad’ Born in Berlin

28th November 2011

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The 6-kilogramme (13-pound) boy was born at Berlin’s Charité hospital to a 40-year-old, 240-kilogramme (528-pound) woman who also had gestational diabetes and most likely a metabolic disorder, according to doctors.

Women suffering from untreated gestational diabetes – when a pregnant woman who doesn’t previously suffer from diabetes has excessively high blood sugar – tend to produce particularly overweight babies.

Presumably they considered — and rejected — a more traditional European name, like ‘Pogrom’ or ‘Holocaust’.

The boy will join nine brothers and four sisters – four of which had birth weights of more than five kilograms.

And doesn’t that bode well for the future. They could easily afford to lose a few as suicide bombers.

As always, the comments are the best part.

Posted in Living with Islam. | Comments Off

The Forgotten Look of Prosperity

28th November 2011

Walter Russell Mead mocks the eminently mockable New York Times.

The New York Times editorial page is doing its level best to kill any chance of American recovery and prosperity by crusading against anything anywhere that might help our energy woes, but sometimes its news pages inadvertently remind us that prosperity and energy development are closely connected.

Decline is so much more decorous.  Prairie towns slowly wither on the vine; the young people quietly leave, the stores gradually empty and close.  Reporters from the Times write haunting and moving stories about the gentle, drifting sadness of it all. Novelists in creative writing programs can write delicate tales of rural decline; filmmakers can make understated little films about the lost hope and vanished promise of the American dream.

Posted in Whose turn is it to be the victim? | Comments Off

The Enduring Cult of Kennedy

27th November 2011

Ross Douthat pees all over the Legend of JFK. And about time, too.

THE cult of John F. Kennedy has the resilience of a horror-movie villain. No matter how many times the myths of Camelot are seemingly interred by history, they always come shambling back to life — in another television special, another Vanity Fair cover story, another hardcover hagiography.

Kennedy was arguably the most incompetent President of the 20th century until Jimmy Carter.

Posted in Think about it. | Comments Off

Egyptian Rally Features Repeated Calls for Killing Jews

27th November 2011

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That’s some fine Religion o’ Peace™ you got there, Mohammed.

Posted in Living with Islam. | Comments Off

Blame Your Crooked Teeth on Early Farmers

27th November 2011

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When humans turned from hunting and gathering to farming some 10,000 years ago, they set our species on the road to civilization. Agricultural surpluses led to division of labor, the rise of cities, and technological innovation. But civilization has had both its blessings and its curses. One downside of farming, a new study demonstrates, was a shortening of the human jaw that has left precious little room for our teeth and sends many of us to an orthodontist’s chair.

Posted in News You Can Use. | 1 Comment »

A Turkey Of An Op-Ed

27th November 2011

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This is somewhat untimely, but still worth pondering.

I have never understood the bleeding-heart whiners who sob and moan over the fact that people convicted of murder get terminated.

This is not tragedy, such as people who contract fatal diseases or die in freak car accidents. This is not (popular mythology to the contrary notwithstanding) oppression, like Christians run over by Muslim tanks in Cairo. This is not even obvious miscarriage of justice, like some poor black kid getting lynched by a mob of Democrats because he kissed a white girl, as happened far too often in the South. This is a long-established system (granted, less than perfect) for removing from society people who have demonstrated that they do not choose to live by the same rules as everyone else, rules that are objectively demonstrable as necessary for society to exist at all. Who could have a problem with that, except someone who has become so totally detached from reality that his judgment is suspect in every realm of life?

Certainly, there are people on death row who don’t belong there. There isn’t, however, anyone on death row who doesn’t belong somewhere other than wandering around loose where he (and it’s almost always a he) can bother innocent citizens — Pat Boone doesn’t wind up on death row. Considering the number of murders who happen every year, and the number of people who are executed for murder every year, one could almost say that it’s more likely somebody in prison will die of food poisoning than of deliberate execution.

There is a very good case to be made (certainly from a Christian perspective) against capital punishment, but there is no good case to be made for letting these people out on the street. I’m curious how these armchair judges would feel about hosting such convicts for five or ten years in their spare bedrooms, just to prove their sincerity?

Posted in Axis of Drivel. | Comments Off

Hotel Chain Settles Discrimination Suit With Autistic Clerk

27th November 2011

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Comfort Suites will pay $132,500 to settle a disability discrimination lawsuit filed against the hotel chain on behalf of a San Diego hotel clerk with autism, the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission announced Monday.

Tarsadia further agreed to sweeping changes, including revising its policies and procedures with respect to ADA compliance.

One of those sweeping changes, I’ll bet you, is a determination never again to hire somebody with a disability, even if it means spending whatever it takes to automate that job so as not to run any risk by hiring someone at all.

And the dimwitted wonder why companies aren’t hiring….

Posted in Dystopia Watch | Comments Off

After Taking In Refugees for Years, a New Hampshire City Asks for a Pause

27th November 2011

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This city has long been a resettlement site for refugees, sent here by the State Department for a chance at a better life. More than 60 languages are spoken in the school system, with Somalis, Sudanese, Iraqis and other recent arrivals mixing with children whose ancestors came from Quebec to work in the mighty textile mills along the Merrimack River.

I don’t suppose that the inhabitants were consulted about whether they wanted to turn their quiet New England town into some sort of U.N. dumping ground. Why don’t they go to New York City, which delights in that kind of thing?

In a highly unusual move, Mayor Ted Gatsas and the city’s Board of Aldermen asked the State Department in July to halt resettlements here for now. A tide of more than 2,100 refugees over the last decade — most recently, Bhutanese families coming from camps in Nepal — has been more than the city of 109,500 can assure jobs and decent housing for, Mr. Gatsas said.

Oh, as if that’s ever been a consideration.

Posted in Dystopia Watch | Comments Off

U.K.: Lebanese Christian Worker at Heathrow Files Suit After Being Harassed by Muslim Co-Workers, Fired Over Their Accusations

27th November 2011

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“She said that she was the subject of a complaint by an Islamic colleague which was specious and that when she raised her own concerns as a Christian, she was the one who was dismissed.”

Welcome to Londonistan.

Posted in Living with Islam. | Comments Off

Who Was the First Blogger?

27th November 2011

James Altucher thinks it was Charles Schulz. He makes a good case.

Charles Schulz, the creator of Charlie Brown, wrote the strip from 1950 to 2000, just about every day. He was basically a blogger. I don’t even know if he missed a single day.

It’s hard to come up with ideas that are meaningful every day. But he did. Here’s 7 things I learned by reading his various biographies and also by probably reading every strip he every produced.

Posted in Think about it. | 1 Comment »

First Inkjet-Printed Graphene Computer Circuit Is Transparent, Flexible

27th November 2011

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The actual meat of the discovery is that graphene has been successfully chipped off a block of graphite using a chemical solvent. These flakes are then filtered to remove any larger, print head-clogging chunks, and then turned into a polymer ink. Despite its amazing properties, graphene hasn’t yet found a way into our computers is because it’s currently very hard and expensive to produce, isolate, and use in silicon circuits. Cambridge’s discovery probably won’t help IBM bring 100GHz graphene circuits to market, though — but it could enable, quite literally, wearable computers.

We have the technology.

Posted in News You Can Use. | Comments Off

HAPPY DANCE SUNDAY

27th November 2011

In the Mood

Posted in Is this a great country, or what? | Comments Off

The Dwindling Power of a College Degree

27th November 2011

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“When everybody’s somebody
Then no-one’s anybody.”

 

Posted in Dystopia Watch | 1 Comment »

Genetic Study Confirms: First Dogs Came from East Asia

27th November 2011

Read it.

Just in case you were wondering. I know I was.

Posted in News You Can Use. | Comments Off

It’s Amazing What Airlines Get Away With

27th November 2011

Read it.

Add the government Gestapo on top of it, and really, it’s not worth the hassle.

Posted in Dystopia Watch | Comments Off

96 Hours to the Stone Age: How Quickly Our Connected Lives Crumble When the Power Goes Out

26th November 2011

Read it.

How will you handle even simple purchases without power, communications or cash? As we increasingly transact via credit cards, online and even cell phones, cash has become much less prevalent. If the ATMs are down, and you don’t have enough emergency cash on hand, what do you do?

Already, it seems that for a broad range of demographics, especially those under 25, cash is already dead. Or, if there are emergency radio broadcasts and the broadcasts says that emergency help is located at a certain park in a certain city, what good is that information to a GPS reliant person who never learned to read a map and doesn’t own any maps?

Mormons will be fine; they’re required to have a year’s supply of food on hand. The rest of us, well….

Posted in Dystopia Watch | 4 Comments »

Iran to U.S., Israel: Don’t Attack Us, or Turkey Gets It

26th November 2011

Read it.

Pray do not throw us in that briar patch.

And, oddly enough, Turkey would finally ‘get it’ with respect to Iran.

Win-win.

Posted in Living with Islam. | 1 Comment »

Why Blacks Don’t Join the Occupy Wall Street Movement

26th November 2011

Freeberg nails it yet again.

My theory is mostly the same, although simpler. It’s like saying, how come only-children aren’t as excited about becoming competitive? Answer there, as with here, is: There is no reason to be. Logic is the Great Equalizer with creed and race; group-think is not. Group-think reverberates its messages within social or working groups, and the simple fact is that our social and working groups remain racially polarized. Yes, it is embarrassing to the left, to the protest movements, and to Occupy Wall Street. It puts the big-reveal on the idea that we as a society cannot protest our way toward racial harmony.

If it made sense, you could recruit across communities, racial, gender, sex-preference lines. The irony is that capitalism does this. If something makes sense, people move. Occupy Wall Street doesn’t make sense, and it only appears to make sense when you’re being moved toward it as part of a big flash-mob crowd. Things look different outside of the crowd. Rather like drinking large amounts of alcohol; the drunk thinks all his jokes are funny, and he isn’t quite talking loud enough.

Posted in Think about it. | Comments Off