DYSPEPSIA GENERATION

We have seen the future, and it sucks.

Archive for August, 2010

Rich people still support Obama

31st August 2010

Half Sigma examines an inconvenient truth.

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Making Soldiers Fit to Fight, Without the Situps

31st August 2010

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Disgusting. I rather doubt that the Marines make the same choices.

Posted in Dystopia Watch | 2 Comments »

Plans to combine British and French navies to be discussed in Paris this week.

31st August 2010

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I can hear Nelson spinning in his grave from Texas.

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4 Israelis shot dead in West Bank

31st August 2010

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Four Israelis — including a pregnant woman — were killed Tuesday near Hebron in the West Bank in a shooting for which the militant wing of Hamas claimed responsibility, officials said.

The incident occurred near Bani Naim junction, the largely Palestinian territory where Jews have settled in places like Hebron, Israel Defense Forces spokeswoman Lt. Col. Avital Leibowitz said. The victims were in a car on Route 60, the IDF website said.

Guy Gonen, a paramedic who was one of the first people on the scene, said the car was sprayed with bullets.

Izzedin Al-Qassam Brigades — the military wing of Hamas — claimed “complete” responsibility for the attack, according to a statement on its website.

Abu Obeida, a spokesman for the group, confirmed responsibility for the attack in an interview with the Hamas radio station.

Sami Abu Zuhri, a Hamas spokesman in Gaza, congratulated the attackers, saying the attack was a normal reaction to what he called “the crime of occupation.” Hamas, which controls Gaza, opposes direct talks and the continued existence of Israel.

That’s some fine Religion o’ Peace you got there, Mohammed.

Posted in Living with Islam. | Comments Off

Iraqis want American to stay

31st August 2010

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That is the paradox of Fallujah, the city that saw the bitterest fighting of America’s seven years in Iraq. Its inhabitants regard the Americans with hatred, but say they represent their only insurance against the enemies by whom they are surrounded: al-Qaeda, the Iraqi government, and Iranian agents.

Remind me why we’re wasting our time (and money) on these people?

Posted in Living with Islam. | Comments Off

Asimov, Krugman, Hayek, Popper, Plato: All Together

31st August 2010

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You know, this actually explains something important, and, yes, I am serious. Paul Krugman writes in re: Isaac Asimov:

Asimov, and specifically the Foundation trilogy, was my great inspiration; I became an economist because I wanted to be a psychohistorian, saving civilization through the mathematics of human behavior.

The psychohistorians use mathematical models to predict the course of human civilization, and the founder of the science of psychohistory, Prof. Hari Seldon, takes on a kind of godlike role in guiding human history. Of particular interest are what are known as “Seldon crises,” which, as Wikipedia sums it up, “are part of the field of psychohistory, and refer to a social and political situation that, to be successfully surmounted, would eventually leave only one possible, inevitable, course of action.” One unique solution to a sociopolitical problem, determined with mathematical precision by a very powerful professor with friends in government. Talk about your fatal conceits!

Fatal for more than the principals.

Asimov and Krugman both believe(d) that human behavior can be (and ought to be) beneficially managed by disinterested technicians who use the Amazing Power of Science to solve all problems, right all wrongs, and immanentize the eschaton.

Asimov makes this explicit in his Lucky Starr novels, where the solar system is ruled by the Council of Science (of which protagonist Lucky Starr is a member), but it runs throughout his work: All we need do is let the Smartest Guys in the Room (of whom the Good Doctor Asimov, ahem, was naturally one) run everything, and the rest of us can get along about our business, in the sure and certain knowledge that everything will turn out as well as it can. Marxists and other proponents of centrally planned economies suffer from the same delusion, with results as we have seen them.

The problem with Krugman’s worldview — the basic problem with managerial statism — is that it calls for masterminds, and we do not have any. But Krugman aspires to the role, and the fruits of his aspirations, and those of others, are all around us.

Hear, hear.

Posted in Dystopia Watch | 1 Comment »

Bronx Trial Shows how Prisons Breed Terrorists

31st August 2010

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Of course, they breed every sort of criminal; why should terrorists be left out of the mix?

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For Health Care Lobbyists, ObamaCare Is the Gift That Keeps On Giving

31st August 2010

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In his January State of the Union speech, President Obama woefully declared that “each time lobbyists game the system or politicians tear each other down instead of lifting this country up, we lose faith.” But by the following month, The Hill was reporting that “despite his push to rein in special interests, President Barack Obama sparked a boom on K Street.” Lobbyists for the health care industry in particular were given an enormous boost in Washington as the health care bill rolled slowly through Congress and then moved on to the regulatory phase.

How’s that Hope & Change thing working out for ya?

The Crust takes care of its own.

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Obama aide: Iraq speech not a victory lap

31st August 2010

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Of course not. Surrender-monkeys don’t get victory laps.

When President Obama steps into the Oval Office to deliver his prime-time address on Tuesday, he won’t be taking a victory lap and won’t utter the words “mission accomplished, a top aide says.

Indeed. You have to have a mission objective in order to know whether it’s accomplished. We’ve never had that In Iraq — or Afghanistan, for that matter.

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Palestinian rivals crack down harder on opponents

31st August 2010

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New reports by Palestinian rights groups highlight a surprising symmetry in the abuse that the U.S.-backed government of Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas in the West Bank and his Iranian-supported rivals Hamas in Gaza inflict on each other.

If there aren’t any Americans or Jews to kill, Muslims gladly kill each other. No wonder they are loved on the Left, which was feeling deprived now that they didn’t have the old Soviet empire any more.

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Eddie Bernice Johnson (D, TX-30) diverted scholarship money to family members.

31st August 2010

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So.  We have a legislator named Eddie Bernice Johnson (D, TX-30), member of the Congressional Black Caucus, and thus one of the people whose responsibility it is to hand out partial college scholarships to worthy recipients.  A worthy project, to be sure: good policy, good politics, good publicity.  There is – sensibly – a non-nepotism rule; and there is – also sensibly – a rule that this money is to be given to students in your district.  But there is apparently no oversight at all over who gets the money, which is why Rep. Johnson was able to use this money gave 15 scholarships to six ineligible kids – four grandchildren and two kids of an aide – and none of them live in the district.  Important point, there: even if grandchildren and children of aides don’t count under the anti-nepotism rule (an argument which the CBC itself rejects), the point of the whole thing is to foster local education.  Rep. Johnson’s defense?  She’s a nine-term Congresswoman who somehow missed the fact that she wasn’t supposed to give CBC scholarships to out-of-district family members.

She’s a female black Democrat politician, a gold-standard victim and member of the Crust, and therefore above criticism.

Please remember this when Rep. Johnson is defended – and she will be.  They’ll talk about her relative lack of personal wealth; they’ll talk about how she at least didn’t actually steal the money; they’ll talk about the relatively small amounts involved; they’ll talk about the need of those kids for those scholarships; and they’ll undoubtedly call people racists for even broaching the subject of yet another member of the CBC who’s involved in shenanigans.  What they won’t do is admit that Rep. Johnson has no right to be defended.  She was given money dedicated to bettering the lives of her constituents.  She instead used it to better the lives of her family and subordinates.

Muslims would understand, because that’s what they’d do. Normal Americans? Not so much.

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Giving up the Pretense on Socialism

31st August 2010

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Remember just a few months ago when every leftist in America screamed whenever anyone on the right accused Obama and the Democrats of being socialists? You’d think we’d just called them something profane other than describing who they actually are.

Now, here we have two lefty feminists convinced one of Sarah Palin’s worst traits is that she bashes socialism. Voters delivered themselves into the hands of San Francisco Democrats without realizing it and are now desperately trying to extricate themselves.

When the cockroaches no longer fear the light, then you know it’s getting bad.

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“Bad Students”—Unmentionable Cause Of The Great Achievement Gap

31st August 2010

Steve Sailer makes a career of being Politically Incorrect.

What do homebuyers mean when they say ‘bad schools?’ Occasionally, they do have highly specific criticisms: the principal might be disorganized, the teachers unmotivated, the textbooks incomprehensible. Overwhelmingly, though, Americans use the term ‘bad schools’ to mean—‘bad students.’

That’s the single most important key to the ‘two-income trap.’ Parents spend huge amounts of money to keep their children away from dim and dangerous fellow students.

That bad students can make a school bad is a lesson that tens of millions of Americans besides Weissberg have learned the hard way. Yet, when it comes to thinking about education, we’re not supposed to draw any insights from our own lives. In contrast, you can win fame and, if not fortune, at least a pleasant career by loudly proclaiming that bad schools make good students bad.

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Building a better human

31st August 2010

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Well, more like tweaking the existing human, but you know what they mean.

Now if we can only get people to agree on what constitutes ‘better’….

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Your genes determine whether you will respond to surveys

31st August 2010

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Humanity is in general genetically predisposed not to take surveys, according to new research. However there exists a proportion of mutant freaks whose genes make them want to respond to surveys.

That explains a lot.

The amazing news comes as part of a new study by profs in America and Singapore. This involved the cunning sending out of a survey to over 1,000 sets of twins.

Hey, tenure doesn’t grow on trees, you know.

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The Gender-Neutral Pronoun: 150 Years Later, Still an Epic Fail

30th August 2010

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Posted in Think about it. | 1 Comment »

The Clockwork Man – Steampunk goes casual

30th August 2010

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Tesla Motors pays huge fine for lacking emissions Certificate of Conformity

30th August 2010

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Yet another example of government screwing up everything it touches by following The Rules rather than common sense. (Nobody ever got fired for following the rules. Common sense–not so much.)

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Accomplish the impossible by breaking it into smaller pieces

30th August 2010

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Aristotle called this ‘analysis’. Funny how the old guy is still relevant after all these years.

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They Crawl, They Bite, They Baffle Scientists

30th August 2010

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‘Progressives’? No, bedbugs. (There is a distinction. Trust me.)

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MAN EATING GIANT SQUID DEVOURING FISH STOCKS

30th August 2010

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Just in case you were wondering. I know I was.

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‘Stand with us on September 11′

30th August 2010

Robert Spencer of Jihad Watch sounds the call.

Don’t spit in our face and tell us it’s raining. Over seventy percent of Americans oppose the Islamic supremacist mega-mosque at Ground Zero. We oppose it because it is an insult, an offense to the memories of those who were killed in the name of Islam at the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001. We oppose it because it will be understood all over the Islamic world as a victory mosque marking that heinous mass-murder nine years ago. And we oppose it because the mosque leaders have an ever-lengthening record of dishonesty — dishonesty about their intentions, their funding, their support for jihad terrorism, and more.

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Where is the Sarah Palin of the Left?

30th August 2010

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For all the talk of their support for women, there is no one on a national level doing for liberals what Sarah Palin is doing for conservatives in this election. Who is helping the Democratic women win seats? The highest ranking woman in the Democratic Party? No, Nancy is focused on investigating the Ground Zero Mosque detractors and still trying to sell a health care plan that has already been passed. … Instead of finding better candidates to run against the fresh crop of small government advocates, Nancy Pelosi is cherrypicking the candidates she can throw under the bus this fall.

And don’t get me started with Hillary Clinton.

The problem with women of the Left is that they’re too tightly focused on forcing their way into what they view as the Old Boy’s Club; they don’t realize that, once they’ve forced their way in, it merely makes them Old Boys with boobs.

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Hatching Bigger Government

30th August 2010

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There have been a lot of unsurprising news stories lately. Rod Blagojevich going on TV. Tiger Woods and his wife divorcing. The economy racing along like an elderly tortoise. And the Food and Drug Administration saying the salmonella outbreak proves the agency needs more power.

We should have seen that coming. In the private sector, entities that fall short of doing their jobs find themselves forced to shrink. In the public sector, the opposite is typically true. Failure is an option, and often a beneficial one.

The Federal Reserve Board and Treasury facilitated the 2008 financial crisis? Then obviously we have no choice but to give them even more responsibility. The Securities and Exchange Commission let Bernie Madoff rob investors? A bigger SEC will be a smarter SEC.

It’s true that the FDA is charged with assuring food safety. But really, the government can’t do that. The task is too big and too complex. Fortunately, it doesn’t have to do it, because the pressures of competition force producers to make sure their goods are clean and wholesome.

What goes curiously unnoticed is that egg suppliers and grocery stores have nothing to gain from sickening their customers—and a lot to lose. It doesn’t take many obvious hygiene lapses for a company to get a bad reputation, and a bad reputation can be catastrophic.

In 1971, a New York man died of botulism after eating a can of Bon Vivant soup. If you’ve never heard of Bon Vivant soup, there’s a simple explanation: In no time at all, the company was bankrupt and the brand was as defunct as William McKinley.

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Man looking for ‘ghost train’ killed by the real thing

30th August 2010

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Let that be a lesson to us all.

Posted in Dystopia Watch | 1 Comment »

UK: Jump jets to fall victim to spending cuts

30th August 2010

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Britain is on the verge of being a Scandinavian country with respect to its military.

When you spend (and borrow against) all your tax revenue on free butter, there isn’t anything left for guns.

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Dinosaurs ‘wiped out by meteor shower lasting thousands of years’

30th August 2010

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Scientists had previously identified the a giant Chicxulub crater in the Gulf of Mexico as the site of a single meteor strike thought to have obliterated prehistoric life on Earth.

But evidence for a second impact in Ukraine, dating back thousands of years before the Chicxulub impact, has raised the possibility that the dinosaurs may have been blitzed with a shower of meteorites

Posted in News You Can Use. | 1 Comment »

Enchantment under the sea: bridal suite beneath the waves at Maldives hotel

30th August 2010

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You, too, can risk having to learn to breathe water.

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UK: Dry weather makes 2010 ‘vintage year for archaeology’ says English Heritage

30th August 2010

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The hot, dry conditions in May and June allowed aerial researchers to identify ancient sites visible through the appearance of crop marks in one of the busiest years for such finds since the long, hot summer of 1976.

Crop marks are produced when barley or wheat growing over buried features develop at a different rate from those growing next to them because differences in the depth of soil and the availability of nutrients.

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Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver’s firm gets cut of 9/11-suit payouts

30th August 2010

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Ground Zero workers are on the hook to pay steep interest on money their lawyers borrowed from a group of investors that include Silver and his law partners, The Post has learned.

Silver’s partners at the Weitz & Luxenberg law firm are top board members of a business that quietly loaned money at 18 percent a year to the law firm representing some 9,800 Ground Zero workers with toxic-illness suits against the city.

New York politicians are corrupt? Whoda thunkit?

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Mayor of Violent Mexican Border State Assassinated

30th August 2010

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A new Colombia, right on our doorstep. Perhaps we could, oh, I don’t know, build a fence or something.

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Cash-Poor Local Governments Ditching Public Hospitals

30th August 2010

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More of those good old Unintended Consequences, and another tragic illustration of the fact that whenever the government tries to help with a situation it always winds up making it worse.

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Clean People Feel Morally Superior

29th August 2010

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Well, that’s because we are.

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Scientists crack the genome of the apple

29th August 2010

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The international team of scientists sequenced the DNA make up of the “Golden Delicious” apple and discovered why it is so different to other fruits

The breakthrough is expected to help farmers pinpoint what makes apples crispy, flavoursome and healthy.

At least, once they get past all the lawsuits by the EcoNazis environmental activists.

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Harvard is always first to leverage the brand

29th August 2010

Check it out.

Yale, of course, has too much taste to indulge in this sort of vulgar enterprise.

I suspect that this is a startup run out of a dorm room in Eliot House.

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Oxford English Dictionary ‘will not be printed again’

29th August 2010

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Sales of the third edition of the vast tome have fallen due to the increasing popularity of online alternatives, according to its publisher.

The dictionary’s owner, Oxford University Press (OUP), said the impact of the internet means OED3 will probably appear only in electronic form.

A team of 80 lexicographers has been working on the third edition of the OED – known as OED3 – for the past 21 years.

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A City in the Cloud: Living PlanIT Redefines Cities as Software

29th August 2010

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‘Forward into the future, Comrades!’ I can see the ghost of Lenin smiling.

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World’s Most Advanced Machinery Was Reason For Apple’s Liquidmetal Deal, Expert Says

29th August 2010

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Apple recently licensed Liquidmetal Technology’s IP  for use in consumer electronics. Liquidmetal Technologies is one of the leading companies trying to commercialize space-age metal alloys that are extremely hard and lightweight but can be processed as easily as plastics. NASA has said Liquidmetal is “poised to redefine materials science as we know it in the 21st century.”

In addition, there are the capabilities of Liquidmetal itself. The alloys, also known as  bulk metallic glasses, are as strong as titanium but use only one-third of the material. It can be mixed with very small amounts of precious metals to make jewelry-like finishes, or optimized for functions such as an antenna. And while titanium scratches and magnesium corrodes, Liquidmetal is scratch and corrosion proof, and resistant to greasy marks.

“You get fingerprints all over them and they just disappear,” Merkel says. “You could add gold or silver to get a beautiful look you’ve never seen before.”

Hmmm … say, the components of a handgun?

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Libertarian RPG?

29th August 2010

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A transhuman science fiction game set aboard a space settlement in the Saturnian system. Several generations live on FreeMarket Station: the sons, daughters and grandchildren of the Originals; immigrant travelers from elsewhere in our solar system; and designed-to-order humans fabricated in 3d matter printers. It’s a world without death, without poverty, without sickness and without any need for laws. What will you do with forever?

Posted in Is this a great country, or what? | 3 Comments »

Does Your Language Shape How You Think?

29th August 2010

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Consider this example. Suppose I say to you in English that “I spent yesterday evening with a neighbor.” You may well wonder whether my companion was male or female, but I have the right to tell you politely that it’s none of your business. But if we were speaking French or German, I wouldn’t have the privilege to equivocate in this way, because I would be obliged by the grammar of language to choose between voisin or voisine; Nachbar or Nachbarin. These languages compel me to inform you about the sex of my companion whether or not I feel it is remotely your concern. This does not mean, of course, that English speakers are unable to understand the differences between evenings spent with male or female neighbors, but it does mean that they do not have to consider the sexes of neighbors, friends, teachers and a host of other persons each time they come up in a conversation, whereas speakers of some languages are obliged to do so.

On the other hand, English does oblige you to specify certain types of information that can be left to the context in other languages. If I want to tell you in English about a dinner with my neighbor, I may not have to mention the neighbor’s sex, but I do have to tell you something about the timing of the event: I have to decide whether we dined, have been dining, are dining, will be dining and so on. Chinese, on the other hand, does not oblige its speakers to specify the exact time of the action in this way, because the same verb form can be used for past, present or future actions. Again, this does not mean that the Chinese are unable to understand the concept of time. But it does mean they are not obliged to think about timing whenever they describe an action.

When your language routinely obliges you to specify certain types of information, it forces you to be attentive to certain details in the world and to certain aspects of experience that speakers of other languages may not be required to think about all the time. And since such habits of speech are cultivated from the earliest age, it is only natural that they can settle into habits of mind that go beyond language itself, affecting your experiences, perceptions, associations, feelings, memories and orientation in the world.

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The Neuroscience of The New York Times

29th August 2010

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An examination of the semi-Luddite proclivities of the premier Voice of the Crust.

Is checking your email while you’re waiting in line at the grocery store really hurting your ability to learn?

That’s the basic premise of Matt Richtel’s very popular New York Times story this week, “Digital Devices Deprive Brain of Valuable Downtime.” The article couches its arguments in the language of science, but its actual scientific content is pretty sparse.

And these are the ‘progressives’. Like ‘Democratic Party’, a more entertaining oxymoron has not been seen on this planet for time out of mind.

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How Much Space Does a Library Need?

29th August 2010

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A think-piece about academic library requirements. How will these change when most information is stored electronicaly? And what do we do with the dead-tree editions?

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Why did our ancestors eat each other? Simple: They were hungry.

29th August 2010

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And, oddly enough, that tells you everything you need to know about modern government.

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True Barbarians

29th August 2010

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As career officers will tell you, drive, determination, and a willingness to try something new are the key requirements in a competitive world. This lesson has certainly been taken to heart by the Somali fishermen who, armed with Kalashnikovs and RPGs, have made a career switch to piracy.

As a result of their activities, insurance premiums have shot up. Many shipping companies avoid the Suez Canal and now send their vessels around the Horn of Africa, which adds to fuel costs. Others hire private security firms to go with their ships. A multinational force patrols the Gulf of Aden. But on several occasions, when patrol ships have captured pirates, they have had to release them again because no one wants to prosecute them, as they are likely to be stuck with them, once they have served their time (Somalia is regarded as too dangerous a place to which to repatriate them). This, in the words of Secretary of State Hilary Clinton, “sends the wrong signal.” As a result of American pressure, in the first piracy case to come to trial in Europe, a Dutch court in June sentenced five Somali pirates to five years in jail, which shipping analysts see as unlikely to deter future attacks. Predictably, the pirates have asked for asylum and to have their families sent over upon their release. More sensible efforts to set up regional courts to prosecute captured pirates are ongoing.

The economies of the city-states of Algiers, Tunis, Tripoli, and Sale in Morocco were all built on privateering and slave labor, and all owed allegiance to Istanbul as outposts of the Ottoman Empire.

And, needless to say, all were Muslims. But that’s no surprise – Islam has never, ever had a problem either with slavery or with robbing unbelievers. Mohammed himself indulged in both activities, and Muslims regard him as the Perfect Man. (Bit of cognitive dissonance for black people who choke on George Washington and Thomas Jefferson as slave-owners but embrace Islam … or would be, if they gave it any thought. Not to mention the Muslims running the West African slave trade.)

Posted in Living with Islam. | 2 Comments »

Congresswoman Violated Nepotism Rules, Funneled Thousands to Family and Friends

29th August 2010

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Rep. Eddie Bernice Johnson (D., Texas), a long-serving congresswoman from Dallas, improperly awarded thousands of dollars in college scholarships from the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation, violating nepotism and ethics rules by giving the funds to multiple relatives and the children of top aide Rod Givens.

My, what a surprise. Aren’t you surprised? I’m sure surprised.

Must be part of the Culture of Corruption that Nancy Pelosi was on about recently … oh, wait, she was talking about Republicans….

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The role of information in American “Islamophobia”

29th August 2010

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One theme in the recent MSM hand-wringing about America’s alleged “Islamophobia” is the notion that Americans are giving Muslims a more difficult time now than they did in the immediate aftermath of 9/11. The  Washington Post  conceded that public opinion surveys don’t show a meaningful change, but it quoted unnamed “religious scholars and other experts” who find the change in tone “striking.” And it quoted a Muslim in Tennessee who recalled nothing but good will from the “locals” back in 2001, but who now sees palpable hostility following the decision to build a sprawling new mosque complex in the area.

Since then, we have learned that the radical ideology behind 9/11 is not quite as alien as we thought. Some portion of the American Muslim community – presumably small, but we don’t know how small – is drawn to it.

Moreover, what looks like a considerable portion of those who hold themselves out (and are held out by the MSM) as leaders of American Muslims refuse to disassociate themselves from terrorist groups. They don’t countenance al Qaeda, though they do blame America for that outfit’s terrorist acts. But they won’t repudiate other bloody terrorists, notably Hamas.

Thus, while only the most highly informed Americans probably could have imagined terrorist plotting or even pro-terrorist rhetoric in an American place of worship back in 2001, many can imagine it now, and with reason.

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Armey: Glenn Beck’s ‘Serious, Scholarly Work’

29th August 2010

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Armey, who holds a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Oklahoma, has high praise for Beck’s ability to provide viewers with a “more true and accurate history of the United States.”

“We see it documented at levels of rigor that, in fact, one would expect out of Ph.D. dissertations — [it is] serious, scholarly work,” Armey says. “[Liberal critics] don’t have to argue with Glenn Beck. They have to argue with his documentation and they can’t match that level of rigor.”

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‘I Like Glenn Beck Because He’s Fun to Watch’

29th August 2010

Tim Cavanaugh ‘fesses up to his guilty secret.

Yes, he’s trying, as Moynihan memorably put it, to learn history and teach it at the same time. But so what? Like the dumpy woman with low self-esteem we all dream of, Beck makes up in enthusiasm what he lacks in natural gifts. I like the sense that he’s bringing you his findings as fast as they come in. You get the impression that two weeks ago Beck had never heard of Woodrow Wilson, yet now he has figured out that Woodrow Wilson was one of the most evil people of the 20th century, and he wants to tell everybody. There’s something fun about that, a performance that invites you to help fill in details and fix errors. It’s certainly something you don’t see anywhere else on TV, a medium populated almost entirely by people who are more cocksure about everything than I am about anything.

And he’s right about Woodrow Wilson.

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The Tea Party is a Marxist movement

29th August 2010

Half Sigma has a startling analysis.

We should be clear that the Tea Party is not promoting Communism (an idea which turned out to be really bad), but rather that the Tea Party movement represents the rising class consciousness of the Proletariat, as predicted by Marx.

The modern left doesn’t promote the interests of the Proletariat; it’s the Lumpenproletariat that the left is most concerned about. The Democratic Party relies upon the Lumpenproletariat to win elections, and once elected uses the power of government to advance its own moral agenda which is adverse to the interests of the Proletariat.

The people who write columns in newspapers opining how much they hate the Tea Party movement come from the class most closely analogous to what Marx called the Petit-Bourgeoisie.

I’ll bet you didn’t know that.

Posted in Think about it. | 1 Comment »

How about that: Muslims in Canadian jihad plot were apparently really swell guys

29th August 2010

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Educated, well off, respected in the community. Decent fellows. Then, if poverty and lack of education didn’t cause their jihad, there must be something else. And gee, this is always so awkward: if those factors can’t explain it, there must be something else.

I’m shocked, I tell you, shocked.

Posted in Living with Islam. | Comments Off